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A potential bacterial carrier for bioremediation

Characterization of insoluble potato fiber

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: C. Elliott, Z. Ye, S. Mojumdar, and M. Saleh

Abstract  

One of the limiting factors to the effectiveness of biostimulation and bioremediation is the loss of inoculated material from the site. This can occur by a number of pathways, but is particularly problematic in open water systems where the inoculated material is simply lost in the water. It is desirable to develop new material, a matrix, within which bacteria and/or biostimulants can be incorporated. We have investigated the basic physical properties of insoluble potato starch to eventually evaluate its use as such a matrix. Insoluble starch fibers were prepared from white potato (Solanum tuberosum) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and were compared for their melting temperature by DSC and their ability to bind/aggregate bacteria. The DSC curves for white and sweet potato showed that the melting temperature is 127.34 and 133.05�C for white and sweet potato fibers, respectively. The TG curves for white and sweet potato starches exhibited one main mass loss step corresponding to the DTG peak temperature at 323.39 and 346.93�C, respectively. The two types of fibers, however, showed different binding/aggregation capacities for bacteria, with white potato approximately twice as many cells of Burkholderia cepacia (22.6 billion/g) as cells of Pseudomonas putida. The reverse was true for fibers from sweet potato, binding twice as many cells of Pseudomonas putida (23 billion/g) as cells of Burkholderia cepacia.

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Abstract  

This is the first systematic study of air pollution from heavy metals and other trace elements throughout several industrialized areas and national parks of Eastern Romanian Carpathians using the moss biomonitoring technique. Samples ofHylocomium splendens collected at 120 sites were analyzed by epithermal neutron activation analysis at the pulsed fast reactor IBR-2 at JINR, Dubna, for a wide range of elements including heavy metals and rare earths (Na, Mg, Al, Cl,K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (by (n,p) reaction), Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Th, and U). Copper, lead and cadmium were determined by AAS. Certified Reference Standards of mosses produced for interlaboratory comparisons in the European moss-survey 1995 were used to ensure the quality of the measurements. To present results in the form of coloured contour maps the geographical information system GIS-INTEGRO was used. The regional extent of pollution with specific metals was determined. Results reported are well consistent with those obtained in numerous recent projects carried out in Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Bulgaria and other countries.

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Abstract  

To evaluate the potentiality of the blue-green algae Spirulina platensis as a matrix for the production of Se-containing pharmaceuticals, the background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni using (n,p) reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th were determined in Spirulina platensis biomass by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The possibility of the purpose-oriented incorporation of Se into Spirulina platensis biomass was demonstrated. The polynomial dependence of the Se accumulation on nutritional medium loading was revealed. The analytical technique used allows to control the amount of toxic elements in algae Spirulina platensis. Based on this study, a conclusion of the possibility to use Spirulina platensisas a matrix for the production of Se-containing pharmaceutical was drawn.

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Abstract  

This paper reports on the qualitative and quantitative analyses of light hydrocarbons produced by radiation degradation of N,N-diethylhydroxylamine. The results show that when the absorbed doses are between 10 and 1000 kGy, the main light hydrocarbons are methane, ethane, ethene, propane and n-butane. Their volume fractions are increased with the increase of the dose. The volume fraction of ethene is also increased at low doses with the increase of the dose, but it is decreased with the increase of dose at high doses.

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Abstract  

This paper reports the study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced by radiation degradation of N, N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHA). The results show that when the concentration of DMHA is between 0.1M–0.5M and the dose is between 10–1000 kGy, the volume fraction of hydrogen is very high and increases with the dose. The volume fraction of hydrogen is little dependent on the concentration of DMHA at lower dose but increases with increasing concentration of DMHA at higher dose. The volume fraction of carbon monoxide is very low.

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Alpha, beta, and gamma diversity are three fundamental biodiversity components in ecology, but most studies focus only on the scale issues of the alpha or gamma diversity component. The beta diversity component, which incorporates both alpha and gamma diversity components, is ideal for studying scale issues of diversity. We explore the scale dependency of beta diversity and scale relationship, both theoretically as well as by application to actual data sets. Our results showed that a power law exists for beta diversity-area (spatial grain or spatial extent) relationships, and that the parameters of the power law are dependent on the grain and extent for which the data are defined. Coarse grain size generates a steeper slope (scaling exponent z) with lower values of intercept (c), while a larger extent results in a reverse trend in both parameters. We also found that, for a given grain (with varying extent) or a given extent (with varying grain) the two parameters are themselves related by power laws. These findings are important because they are the first to simultaneously relate the various components of scale and diversity in a unified manner.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: Jeremy Loenneke, C. Fahs, R. Thiebaud, L. Rossow, T. Abe, Xin Ye, D. Kim, and M. Bemben

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms behind the blood flow restriction (BFR) stimulus in the absence of exercise. Nine participants completed a 10 minute time control and then a BFR protocol. The protocol was five, 5-minute bouts of inflation with 3-minutes of deflation between each bout. The pressure was set relative to each individual’s thigh circumference. Significant increases in muscle thickness were observed for both the vastus lateralis (VL) [6%, p = 0.027] and rectus femoris (RF) [22%, p = 0.001] along with a significant decrease in plasma volume [15%, p = 0.001]. Ratings of discomfort during the BFR protocol peaked at 2.7 (light discomfort). There were no significant changes with whole blood lactate, electromyography (EMG), or heart rate (HR), however, there was a trend for a significant increase in HR during the 5th inflation (p = 0.057). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that the attenuation of both muscle atrophy and declines in strength previously observed with brief applications of BFR may have been mediated through an acute fluid shift induced increase in muscle size. This is supported by our finding that the changes in muscle thickness are maintained even after the cuffs have been removed.

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Although significant progress has been made on Agrobacterium -mediated wheat transformation, the current methodologies use immature embryos as recipient tissues, a process which is labor intensive, time consuming and expensive. In this study, we have managed to develop an Agrobacterium -based transformation scheme using explants derived from mature embryos. Based on transient expression of β -glucuronidase (GUS) marker, mature embryo halves prepared from freshly imbibed seeds were generally most susceptible to Agrobacterium -mediated T-DNA transfer. According to the results of callus induction and shoot production, Yumai 66 and Lunxuan 208 showed higher selection and regeneration efficiency than Bobwhite. In line with this finding, fertile T 0 transgenic plants were most readily obtained for both spring and winter wheat when mature embryo halves were used for co-inoculation by Agrobacterium cells. The presence of the antibiotic selection marker ( nptII , encoding neomycin phosphotransferase II) in the T 0 plants was revealed by both genomic PCR amplification and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additional analysis showed that the transgene was stably inherited from the two different generations and segregated normally among the T 1 progenies. Further development along this line will raise the efficiency of wheat transformation and increase the use of this approach in the molecular breeding of wheat crop.

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Abstract  

The recombination of hydrogen and oxygen in technical gaseous waste of nuclear power plants in enlarged scale experiment has been studied on the basis of our previous work.1 The catalyst and its best operating conditions for recombination of hydrogen and oxygen determined in a small scale experiment were demonstrated and tested. The results show that the data obtained in an enlarged scale experiment agreed well with that of in a small scale test. The recombination rate of H2 and O2 was higher than 98.3% and 99.98% respectively. After recombination, the residual concentrations of H2 and O2 in waste gas were O2<3 ppm, H2<400 ppm. The Pd-Al2O3 catalyst and operating conditions determined for gaseous waste processing of nuclear power plants were satisfactory.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: Robert Thiebaud, J.P. Loenneke, C.A. Fahs, D. Kim, X. Ye, T. Abe, K. Nosaka, and M.G. Bemben

Discrepancies exist whether blood flow restriction (BFR) exacerbates exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). This study compared low-intensity eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with and without BFR for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage. Nine untrained young men (18–26 y) performed low-intensity (30% 1RM) eccentric contractions (2-s) of the elbow flexors with one arm assigned to BFR and the other arm without BFR. EIMD markers of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque, range of motion (ROM), upper arm circumference, muscle thickness and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately after, 1, 2, 3, and 4 days after exercise. Electromyography (EMG) amplitude of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis were recorded during exercise. EMG amplitude was not significantly different between arms and did not significantly change from set 1 to set 4 for the biceps brachii but increased for the brachioradialis (p ≤ 0.05, 12.0% to 14.5%) when the conditions were combined. No significant differences in the changes in any variables were found between arms. MVC torque decreased 7% immediately post-exercise (p ≤ 0.05), but no significant changes in ROM, circumference, muscle thickness and muscle soreness were found. These results show that BFR does not affect EIMD by low-intensity eccentric contractions.

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