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  • Author or Editor: Maria Cristina Veronesi x
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In order to define the normal composition of canine amniotic fluid and to detect differences between surviving and non-surviving newborn puppies, the present study determined the uric acid, glucose, lactate and creatinine concentrations and the lactate to creatinine ratio in amniotic fluids collected during elective Caesarean section from small-sized purebred bitches. The possible relationship between newborn survival and the studied parameters, as well as the effects of maternal parity, fetal gender and Apgar score were assessed. The study enrolled 27 small-sized purebred bitches submitted to elective Caesarean section at term. After opening the fetal membranes, amniotic fluid samples were collected aseptically from the amniotic sac of each fetus. The data obtained from 74 amniotic fluid samples collected from 27 bitches showed that amniotic glucose concentration was lower (P < 0.05) in non-surviving than in surviving puppies. Within the normal, surviving puppies, amniotic glucose concentration was higher (P < 0.05) in male than in female newborns, and the lactate/creatinine ratio was significantly higher in multiparous than in primiparous bitches (P < 0.05). These preliminary results demonstrate the relevance of amniotic glucose, but not of uric acid, lactate, creatinine and the lactate to creatinine ratio for detecting puppies at risk of death immediately after birth.

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Authors: Augusto Carluccio, Ippolito De Amicis, Monica Probo, Brunella Giangaspero and Maria Cristina Veronesi

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of uterine prolapse in cows and assess its effects on survival and subsequent fertility. Of 33,450 calving cows considered retrospectively, 216 (0.6%) developed uterine prolapse. A higher prevalence was found in beef cows (n = 57/5,700 cows, 1%) compared to dairy cows (n = 157/27,750 cows, 0.6%). Treatment consisted of cleaning and replacing the uterus with local administration of antibiotics, and applying a harness for uterine containment. The recovery rate was 81.9% (n = 177), similar in dairy (n = 129; 81.1%) and beef (n = 48; 84.2%) cows. Of the 216 cows with uterine prolapse, 18 (8.3%) died before or immediately after treatment; 21 cows (9.7%) were voluntarily culled for economic reasons (low milk yield, low fertility, insufficient weight gain). All recovered dairy cows were artificially inseminated with semen of proven fertility after a voluntary waiting period of 50 days; the beef cows were naturally mated. Among the 172 inseminated/mated cows, 84.7% (n = 150) became pregnant (83.7% dairy cows, 87.5% beef cows), while 15.2% (n = 27) did not conceive. Recurrence of uterine prolapse at subsequent calvings was recorded in one dairy cow. Based upon the data presented here, treated cows with uterine prolapse showed high chances of survival and conception, and a low risk of recurrence.

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Authors: Augusto Carluccio, Ippolito De Amicis, Monica Probo, Brunella Giangaspero and Maria Cristina Veronesi

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of uterine prolapse in cows and assess its effects on survival and subsequent fertility. Of 33,450 calving cows considered retrospectively, 216 (0.6%) developed uterine prolapse. A higher prevalence was found in beef cows (n = 57/5,700 cows, 1%) compared to dairy cows (n = 157/27,750 cows, 0.6%). Treatment consisted of cleaning and replacing the uterus with local administration of antibiotics, and applying a harness for uterine containment. The recovery rate was 81.9% (n = 177), similar in dairy (n = 129; 81.1%) and beef (n = 48; 84.2%) cows. Of the 216 cows with uterine prolapse, 18 (8.3%) died before or immediately after treatment; 21 cows (9.7%) were voluntarily culled for economic reasons (low milk yield, low fertility, insufficient weight gain). All recovered dairy cows were artificially inseminated with semen of proven fertility after a voluntary waiting period of 50 days; the beef cows were naturally mated. Among the 172 inseminated/mated cows, 84.7% (n = 150) became pregnant (83.7% dairy cows, 87.5% beef cows), while 15.2% (n = 27) did not conceive. Recurrence of uterine prolapse at subsequent calvings was recorded in one dairy cow. Based upon the data presented here, treated cows with uterine prolapse showed high chances of survival and conception, and a low risk of recurrence.

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