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  • Author or Editor: Mihály Szegedy-Maszák x
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A literary historian is not qualified to comment on a work by a musicologist unless it ideals with literature as much as with music. The author of this book attempts to situate Bartók's musiv in cultural history. She aims high—perhaps a little too high-but the books has undeniably a much wider horizon than most, it not all, full-lenght studies of the works greatest Hungarian musician of the first half of the twentieth century.

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Summary The paper discusses the political views of János Asbóth, an outstanding representative of the nineteenth-century Hungarian Conservatism, explained in his various works. Asbóth's Conservatism cannot be characterized by Friedrich A. Hayek's terms as 'fear of change' or 'fondness for authority'; it rather shows similarity to Edmund Burke's attitude. Asbóth clearly considered progress the task of the human race, but he wanted progress to be continuous and organic. He might be regarded as a disillusioned Liberal too, since his Conservatism seemed to be based on the criticism of Liberalism, which he did not think could cope with the challenge of Socialism. On the other hand, he thought that Conservatism was more flexible an ideology, since it started from given circumstances and focused on the needs of the state and its citizens, while Liberals started from principles, which involved certain goals. The paper also discusses Asbóth's criticism of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy and the relations between political and cultural Conservatism.

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To call uneven the Hungarian reception of the works of Henry James would be an understatement. The start was rather promising. Roderick Hudson was published in Hungarian translation two years after it appeared in English, and in 1880 The American was published in installments in a daily newspaper. It is not easy to explain why it took almost ninety years for a Hungarian publisher to bring out more works by James. Neither the impressionistic essayists of the 1920s and 30s nor the later spokesmen of Marxism could do justice to the achievement of the American-born writer. His more sympathetic interpreters emerged with the rise of structuralist narratology, hermeneutics, reception-oriented research, and deconstruction. With the rapidly growing number of readers familiar with the works in the original, further reinterpretations may be expected. The conclusion is inescapable that the reception of the works of James proves how closely the understanding of literature is related to ideological and cultural trends.

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