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  • Author or Editor: Mikó Árpád x
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Abstract

In September 1563 Archduke Maximilian, son of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I was crowned King of Hungary at Pozsony (Bratislava). For the coronation ceremony two triumphal arches were built at the ends of the pontoon bridge over the Danube. (The arches are known from a woodcut of Donat Hübschmann.) The bill of costs of the architect Pietro Ferabosco is here published for the first time.

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Abstract

Two copies of the Missale Strigoniense printed on parchment in Venice in 1498, in the printing office of Emericus de Spira upon the order of the Buda book publisher Johannes Paep survive. Both were adorned with illuminations added to the books in Hungary. The copy of the archbishop of Kalocsa Péter Váradi (1480–1501) is modestly decorated. By contrast, Ferenc Perényi, the bishop of Várad (1514–1526) had his copy sumptuously illumined: nineteen pages have ornate borders all around, five have two or three sides decorated, four have less elaborate tendril ornaments. The woodcut canon picture was naturally painted over and the coat of arms of the possessor was put in front filling a whole page. The Missal was held in high esteem later as well: among its subsequent owners Miklós Oláh, archbishop of Esztergom had an additional ornamental page added, the János Ivánczy, grand provost of Győr had three (the latter also had a finely decorated inscription of the consecutive owners of the volume created, from Miklós Oláh through archbishops of Kalocsa Demeter Náprágyi and Márton Hetési Pethe to himself.) The illuminations painted for Ferenc Perényi represent all registers of renaissance book illumination in Buda in the Jagiellon Age: the reminiscences of the motifs and style of the master of Cassianus, the formal idiom of the creator of the Bakócz initials, the painted ornaments of early 16th century deeds of nobility and the naturalist flower decorations of Flemish miniature painting. The richly embellished incunable has been latent for about fifteen years now – for this reason we present all – so far mostly unpublished – illumined pages.

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Abstract

The treasury of the mediaeval cathedral of Várad (Oradea) was secularized by the Protestant estates of Transylvania in 1557. Following this move, a part of the goldsmith's work and textiles were taken to the castle of Ecsed. The manuscripts and textiles were still there in 1603; the remnants were transported to Kassa (Košice) in 1617. There is evidence, however, that important items of the Várad textiles had left the castle of Ecsed earlier. Gergely Bornemissza, who was bishop of Várad from 1572 to 1584, seems to have been able to get back valuable pieces which were at Jászó when he died (December 1584). The Vienna court had the movables inventoried, for it was customary to exchange a high priest's estate for money. The first step was taken on 27 August 1585, followed soon by an order to transport the silverware to Vienna. The rest was assessed in 1588 when the three inventories discussed in this paper were taken. At that time, there were mainly textiles in Kassa, most of them chasubles, copes and two infulae with beadwork. Outstanding among them were a chasuble showing King St Ladislaus in the company of St Stephen and St Emeric (the crowns of Ss Ladislaus and Stephen were made of silver), and one adorned with the coat of arms of King Matthias Corvinus. The beadwork images on one of the infulae show the Calvary and the Resurrection of Christ. They alone were embellished with precious stones mounted in gold rosettes, the chasubles were not decorated with gems but with beads of varying sizes. There is no doubt that the liturgical vestments that went from Várad into Bishop Gergely Bornemissza's possession were of extraordinary importance. (Nothing is known of their subsequent history.) Bornemissza was already known for art history as the white marble reliefs of King Matthias and Queen Beatrice now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, first appeared in his possession before king Maximilian ordered them to be sent to Vienna.

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