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Objective

The aim of the present short-term follow-up study was to assess the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) with and without adjunct use of an essential-oil-based mouthwash (EOBM) on whole salivary interleukin (IL)-1beta (β) levels in patients with periodontal disease.

Methods

Ninety individuals with periodontal disease were divided into two groups. Patients in group 1 underwent SRP and were instructed to rinse with 10 mL of an EOBM twice daily for 30 days. Patients in group 2 underwent SRP and were instructed to rinse with 10 mL of water twice daily for 30 days. Whole saliva samples were collected, and IL-1β levels were measured at baseline and after 60 days of treatment. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results

At baseline, whole salivary IL-1β levels were comparable among patients in groups 1 (135.6 ± 13.5 μg/mL) and 2 (141.2 ± 5.4 μg/mL). After 60 days of follow-up, there is a significant decrease in whole salivary IL-1β levels among patients in group 1 (10.2 ± 6.4 μg/mL) as compared to those in group 2 (56.6 ± 10.2 μg/mL) (P < 0.01).

Conclusion

SRP, when performed with adjunct use of an EOBM, is more effective in reducing whole salivary IL-1β levels as compared to when SRP is performed without the use of an EOBM.

Open access

Objective

The aim of the present short-term follow-up study was to assess the effects of scaling and root planing (SRP) with or without adjunctive use of an essential-oil-based mouthwash in the treatment of periodontal inflammation in smokers.

Methods

In total, 120 individuals were divided into 2 groups. In Group-1, 60 smokers with periodontal inflammation received SRP alone; and in Grou p-2, 60 smokers with periodontal inflammation received adjunct essential-oil mouthwash therapy. Periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], bleedingon- probing [BOP], and probing pocket depth [PD] ≥ 4 mm) were assessed at baseline and after 90 days of treatment.

Results

There was no significant difference in periodontal parameters (PI, BOP, and PD ≥ 4 mm) among participants in Group-1 and -2. Participants in both groups showed significant reductions in PI (P < 0.01), BOP (P < 0.01), and PD ≥ 4 mm (P < 0.01) at follow-up compared to base line. At 90 days of follow-up, PI (P < 0.05), BOP (P < 0.05), and PD ≥ 4 mm (P < 0.05) were significantly higher in Group-1 compared to Group-2.

Conclusions

SRP with adjunct essential-oil mouthwash therapy is more effective in the treatment o f periodontal inflammation in smokers as compared to when SRP is performed alone.

Open access

Background

Xerostomia is a common clinical problem, and different medications have been tried in its management. In the present study, routine dietary products are used to assess their effect on salivary flow.

Aim

To assess the efficacy of yogurt and lemon juice on increase in salivation and its comparison with that of unstimulated saliva.

Materials and Methods

A total of 40 volunteers (aged 19–48) were selected. The pH of yogurt was calculated, and equivalent pH lemon juice was prepared. First, normal resting saliva was collected as baseline followed by every 1 min for 5 min. Patients were given lemon juice or yogurt and then crossed over to the other group to assess the impact of the stimulants on salivary flow from 1 to 5 min.

Results

The results were analyzed statistically. Comparisons between baseline saliva secretion and that by yogurt and lemon juice (using the ANOVA test) showed that there was a significant increase after treatment at the end of the experiment for both yogurt and lemon juice. However, yogurt showed a significant increase in saliva secretion compared to baseline than lemon juice.

Conclusions

Our findings suggest that yogurt is a potential candidate for the treatment of dry mouth.

Open access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Mohammad Alshehri
,
Abdulaziz Altalhi
,
Hadi J. Alqahtani
,
Meteab A. Almoither
,
Saad A. Alhazzani
,
Mohammad Maish Almohammadi
, and
Omar Kujan

Objective

The aim was to assess the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) with and without adjunct use of an essential-oil-basedmouthwash (EOBM) on whole salivary immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in patients with periodontal inflammation.

Methods

Fifty patients with periodontal inflammation were included. Treatment wise, these patients were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, patients underwent SRP and were instructed to rinse with 10 mL of an EOBM twice daily for 30 days, whereas those in group 2 underwent SRP and were instructed to rinse with 10 mL of water twice daily for 30 days. Whole saliva samples were collected at baseline and after 40 days of treatment. P-values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Results

At baseline, whole salivary IgG levels were comparable among patients in groups 1 (60.5 ± 5.5 mg/dL) and 2 (57.3 ± 2.4 mg/dL). After 40 days of follow-up, there is a significant decrease in whole salivary IgG levels among patients in group 1 (7.2 ± 2.4 mg/dL) as compared to those in group 2 (26.6 ± 4.6 mg/dL) (P < 0.001).

Conclusions

SRP, when performed with adjunct use of an EOBM, is more effective in reducing whole salivary IgG levels as compared to when SRP is performed without adjunct use of an EOBM.

Open access