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Physiology International
Authors: Gholamreza Rezamand, Touraj Mahmoudi, Seidamir Pasha Tabaeian, Hamid Farahani, Fatemeh Shahinmehr, Hossein Nobakht, Reza Dabiri, Asadollah Asadi, Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei, and Mohammad Reza Zali

Abstract

Background

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging global chronic liver disease worldwide. Considering the powerful association between NAFLD, insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, as well as the key role of ghrelin in these metabolic disorders, we hypothesized that some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ghrelin (GHRL) and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) genes might be associated with NAFLD.

Methods

We conducted a case-control retrospective study of 150 cases with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 155 controls. The diagnosis of NAFLD was established before the start of the genotyping process. All the 305 subjects were genotyped for GHRL SNP rs26802 or -501T>G and GHSR SNP rs572169 or Arg159Arg using the PCR-RFLP method.

Results

The GHRL rs26802 “GG” genotype compared with the “TT” genotype and “TT+TG” genotype appears to be a marker of decreased NAFLD susceptibility even after adjustment for confounding factors (P = 0.006; OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.03–0.56 and P = 0.003; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.05–0.53, respectively). However, we observed no significant difference in genotype or allele frequencies between the cases and controls for GHSR SNP rs572169.

Conclusions

These findings proposed, for the first time, that the GHRL rs26802 “GG” genotype has a protective effect against NAFLD. Nonetheless, this observation warrants further investigations in other populations.

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Physiology International
Authors: Gholamreza Rezamand, Touraj Mahmoudi, Seidamir Pasha Tabaeian, Hamid Farahani, Fatemeh Shahinmehr, Hossein Nobakht, Reza Dabiri, Asadollah Asadi, Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei, and Mohammad Reza Zali

Abstract

Background

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging global chronic liver disease worldwide. Considering the powerful association between NAFLD, insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, as well as the key role of ghrelin in these metabolic disorders, we hypothesized that some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the ghrelin (GHRL) and ghrelin receptor (GHSR) genes might be associated with NAFLD.

Methods

We conducted a case-control retrospective study of 150 cases with biopsy-proven NAFLD and 155 controls. The diagnosis of NAFLD was established before the start of the genotyping process. All the 305 subjects were genotyped for GHRL SNP rs26802 or -501T>G and GHSR SNP rs572169 or Arg159Arg using the PCR-RFLP method.

Results

The GHRL rs26802 “GG” genotype compared with the “TT” genotype and “TT+TG” genotype appears to be a marker of decreased NAFLD susceptibility even after adjustment for confounding factors (P = 0.006; OR = 0.14, 95% CI = 0.03–0.56 and P = 0.003; OR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.05–0.53, respectively). However, we observed no significant difference in genotype or allele frequencies between the cases and controls for GHSR SNP rs572169.

Conclusions

These findings proposed, for the first time, that the GHRL rs26802 “GG” genotype has a protective effect against NAFLD. Nonetheless, this observation warrants further investigations in other populations.

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Fahimeh Sadat Gholam-Mostafaei, Abbas Yadegar, Hamid Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Shabnam Shahrokh, Nasser Ebrahimi Daryani, and Mohammad Reza Zali

Abstract

Treatment of recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI) has emerged as an important management dilemma particularly in patients with underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been used as a safe and highly effective treatment option for rCDI refractory to standard antibiotic therapies. The aim of this study was to report the efficacy of FMT in Iranian rCDI patients with concurrent IBD. A total of seven consecutive patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who had experienced 3 episodes of rCDI were enrolled in this study. All patients received at least a single FMT administered during colonoscopy by direct infusion of minimally processed donor stool. Patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months for assessment of treatment efficacy and adverse events (AEs) attributable to FMT. All 7 UC patients (100%) experienced a durable clinical response to a single FMT following 2 months after the procedure. One patient received a second FMT in which a successful resolution of rCDI was ultimately achieved. No serious AEs from FMT were noted. FMT through colonoscopy was a safe, simple and effective alternative treatment approach for rCDI in patients with underlying IBD. However, its use and efficacy should be pursued in long-term prospective controlled trials.

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