Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: N. Ishii x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

In some tea tree planting areas within 300 km from the TEPCO’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), it was found that newly emerged tea plant leaves for green tea contained two radiocesium species (cesium-134 and cesium-137). In this study, using processed green tea leaves for drinking, extraction ratios of radiocesium under several brew conditions were observed. When 90 °C water was used, 50–70% of radiocesium was extracted into the water, while 54–60% of radiocesium was extracted with 60 °C water. A part of radiocesium would be removed from leaves if the leaves were washed with 20 and 60 °C water before brewing, and the efficiencies were 11 and 32%, respectively. Newly emerged camellia leaves were used to simulate the radiocesium removal ratio from raw tea leaves by washing and boiling; radioactivity concentration was decreased to 60% of the original concentration with washing and 10 min boiling. From these results, it was found that almost half of the radiocesium would not be removed from raw or processed tea leaves. The values obtained in the present study could be used for internal radiation dose estimation from tea leaves.

Restricted access

To compare endocrine responses to low-intensity resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (BFR) for upperlimb (UL) and lower-limb (LL) muscles, we measured blood lactate, plasma noradrenaline, and serum growth hormone (GH), testosterone, cortisol and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) before and after the UL (biceps curl and triceps press down) and LL (leg extension and leg curl) exercises with BFR in nine men (26.3 ± 3.1 yr). The load of 30% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) was used in all the exercises, in which the first set of 30 repetitions was followed by the second and third sets to failure. In each exercise program, the proximal portions of their upper arms (UL) or thighs (LL) were compressed bilaterally by elastic belts. Both the UL and LL caused significant increases in lactate, noradrenaline, GH, testosterone, cortisol, and IGF-I concentrations when compared to the pre-exercise values. A significant difference between the UL and LL was observed only in the area under the curve (AUC) of serum GH concentration, indicating that the LL induced greater GH response than did the UL. The greater GH secretion following the LL may be more advantageous for muscle hypertrophy induced by a long-term training period.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Tracer experiments on the transfer of carbon from culture solution to Daphnia magna through phytoplankton have been carried out using 13C and infrared absorption method. The purpose of this experiment is to investigate the experimental systems for the use of 13C in aquatic system. Daphnia magna was cultured in a 100 ml of solution containing phytoplankton and 20 mg of NaH13CO3 for 24 hours in the light and dark conditions (2000 lux, 14 hour light and 10 hours dark at 25 C). The concentration of 13C in Daphnia magna under light condition was about 2.0% (atom% excess), while in the dark condition 13C tracer was not detected. The concentration of 13C in phytoplankton under light condition was around 20%. It was suggested that 13C added as carbonate in the culture solution was photosynthetically assimilated by phytoplankton and then transferred to Daphnia magna. Using this system, the effect of UV-B exposure on the 13C uptake of Daphnia magna has been examined. The UV-B intensity was 95 mW/cm2 and exposure time was 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The concentration of 13C in Daphnia magna decreased with increasing exposure time. The Daphnia magna exposed to UV-B for 15 minutes intakes phytoplankton as much as control, while 30 minutes and 60 minutes exposures were lower than control. The lower concentrations of 13C observed in Daphnia magna were due to less intake of phytoplankton caused by the UV-B exposure.

Restricted access

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of blood flow-restricted training (BFRT) on jump performance in relation to changes in muscle strength. Seventeen untrained young men were assigned into either BFRT or normal training (NORT) groups and performed low-intensity [30–40% of one-repetition maximum (1RM)] resistance exercise (horizontal squat, 3–4 sets × 15–30 repetitions) twice a week for 10 weeks. The BFRT performed the exercise with their proximal thighs compressed by air-pressure cuffs for the purpose of blood flow restriction. Squat 1RM, muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of quadriceps femoris, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height were measured before and after the 10-wk training period. Squat 1RM increased greater in BFRT than in NORT (19.3% vs. 9.7%, P < 0.01). Although the CSA increase was independent of groups, it tended to be larger in BFRT than in NORT (8.3% vs. 2.9%, P = 0.094). On the other hand, CMJ height did not change after the training (P = 0.51). In conclusion, the present study showed that BFRT induced muscle hypertrophy and strength increase, whereas it did not increase CMJ height in previously untrained young men. It is suggested that BFRT is ineffective in improving jump performance.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
T. Sakashita
,
T. Hama
,
S. Fuma
,
M. Doi
,
Y. Nakamura
,
N. Ishii
, and
H. Takeda

Abstract  

To investigate the possibility of 14CO2 fixation using microorganisms in a high-dose area, the photosynthetic activity (specific production rate: SPR) and cellular proliferation (colony forming unit: CFU) of Euglena gracilis Z irradiated with gamma-rays at a dose of 0 to 500 Gy were determined. The dose responses of SPR and CFU suggested that it was possible to operate a CO2 fixation system of Euglena up to 100 Gy. Even at a dose of 500 Gy, about half of the photosynthetic activity under non-irradiated condition was considered possible.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
S. Watanabe
,
Y. Iida
,
N. Suzui
,
T. Katabuchi
,
S. Ishii
,
N. Kawachi
,
H. Hanaoka
,
S. Matsuhashi
,
K. Endo
, and
N. Ishioka

Abstract  

Copper-64 was produced by the 64Ni(p, n)64Cu reaction using enriched 64NiO target. We investigated and compared the production yield of 64Cu for proton beams of various energies by using a thick target. Enriched 64Ni was recovered with high yield by simple procedures. Imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) and positron emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS) were performed. We obtained clear images in PET and PETIS studies. The results of this study indicate that 64Cu can be utilized as a biomedical tracer for the molecular imaging both in animals and plants.

Restricted access