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  • Author or Editor: Nicola Baldini x
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Summary  

This paper focuses on the Danish Act No. 347 of 1999, which granted IPRs on inventions at public research institutions to the institutions themselves. After summarizing the situation in Denmark prior to the new law, I describe the Act's main features and then I turn my attention to the solutions adopted by Danish academia to face the opportunities and challenges posed by the new situation. Finally, using a unique dataset including all patents filed by Danish universities from 1982 to 2003, I describe university patenting activity.

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Abstract  

This paper reviews the literature on the concerns stemming from university patenting and licensing activities. Scholars investigated threats to scientific progress due to increasing disclosure restrictions; changes in the nature of the research (declining patents’ and publications’ quality, skewing research agendas toward commercial priorities, and crowding-out between patents and publications); diverting energies from teaching activity and reducing its quality. A small section explores problems lamented by industry. Each of these issues is presented and discussed, based on 82 papers published from 1980 to 2006. Some suggestions for further research conclude the essay.

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Abstract  

This paper reports results from a survey of 208 Italian faculty members, inventors of university-owned patents, on their motivation to get involved in university patenting activities, the obstacles that they faced, and their suggestions to foster the commercialization of academic knowledge through patents. Findings show that respondents get involved in patenting activities to enhance their prestige and reputation, and look for new stimuli for their research; personal earnings do not represent a main incentive. University-level patent regulations reduce the obstacles perceived by inventors, as far as they signal universities’ commitment to legitimate patenting activities. Implications for innovation policies are discussed.

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