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Abstract

By shortening the time to pathogen identification and allowing for detection of organisms missed by blood culture, new molecular methods may provide clinical benefits for the management of patients with sepsis. While a number of reviews on the diagnosis of sepsis have recently been published we here present up-to-date new developments including multiplex PCR, mass spectrometry and array techniques. We focus on those techniques that are commercially available and for which clinical studies have been performed and published.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: M. M. Heimesaat, I. R. Dunay, D. Fuchs, D. Trautmann, A. Fischer, A. A. Kühl, C. Loddenkemper, A. Batra, B. Siegmund, H.-W. Krell, S. Bereswill, and O. Liesenfeld

Abstract

In the experimental models of intestinal inflammation and humans with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), increased levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and -9 (also referred to as gelatinase A and B, respectively), in inflamed tissue sites can be detected. In the presented study, we investigated potential beneficial effects exerted by doxycycline nonselectively blocking MMPs and the selective gelatinase inhibitor RO28-2653 in acute DSS colitis. Treatment with either compound for 8 days ameliorated clinical colitis pathology with a superior outcome in RO28-2653-treated animals. As compared to placebo controls, histopathological changes in the colon were less distinct following MMP blockage and IL-6 secretion in ex vivo biopsies was downregulated, paralleled by a diminished influx of pro-inflammatory immune cells and lack of overgrowth of the colonic lumen by potentially pro-inflammatory Escherichia coli of the commensal colon flora.

We conclude that selective gelatinase inhibition not only exerts beneficial effects by disrupting the vicious cycle of positive feedback between immune cell stimulation and MMP induction but also prevents overgrowth of the colonic lumen by pro-inflammatory E. coli despite a lack of direct anti-bacterial properties, thus unaffecting the commensal gut microbiota. These findings put RO28-2653 into a center stage for development of intervention strategies in human IBD.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: Markus M. Heimesaat, I. R. Dunay, D. Fuchs, D. Trautmann, A. Fischer, A. A. Kühl, C. Loddenkemper, B. Siegmund, A. Batra, S. Bereswill, and O. Liesenfeld

Abstract

Expression of gelatinases A and B, also referred to matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9, respectively, is increased in inflamed tissues of experimental intestinal inflammation and humans with inflammatory bowel disease (IBDs). Given that we recently reported that treatment with the selective gelatinase inhibitor RO28-2653 ameliorates acute dextrane sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis, we asked whether gelatinase A or B expression is pivotal in mediating large intestinal inflammation. Results from our study reveal that symptoms of acute DSS colitis as well as histopathological colonic changes were ameliorated in MMP-2-, but not MMP-9-deficient mice, and were paralleled by a diminished influx of immune cells. In MMP-2-deficient mice, we observed lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and IL-6 in colonic biopsies and less overgrowth of the colonic lumen by potentially pro-inflammatory enterobacteria from the commensal gut microbiota. We conclude that rather MMP-2 than MMP-9 is causative for the establishment of DSS colitis in mice. The discrepancy of these data to prior reports might be due to substantial differences in the intestinal microbiota composition of the mice bred at different animal facilities impacting susceptibility to inflammatory stimuli. Consequently, a detailed survey of the gut microbiota should be implemented in immunological/inflammatory studies in the future in order to allow comparison of data from different facilities.

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: C. Alvarado-Esquivel, S. J. Pacheco-Vega, M. Salcedo-Jaquez, L. F. Sánchez-Anguiano, J. Hernández-Tinoco, E. Rábago-Sánchez, M. M. Centeno-Tinoco, I. D. Flores-Garcia, A. Ramos-Nevarez, S. M. Cerrillo-Soto, C. A. Guido-Arreola, I. Beristain-García, O. Liesenfeld, L. O. Berumen-Segovia, L. Saenz-Soto, and A. Sifuentes-Álvarez

Through a cross-sectional study design, 150 women attending public health centers with a history of stillbirths were examined for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies in Durango City, Mexico. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of T. gondii seropositivity with the characteristics of the women with stillbirth history.

Of the 150 women (mean age: 32.09 ± 9.16 years) studied, 14 (9.3%) had anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies and six (42.9%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii seropositivity was associated with high frequency (4–7 days a week) of eating meat (OR = 5.52; 95% CI: 1.48–20.59; P = 0.01), history of lymphadenopathy (OR = 4.52; 95% CI: 1.14–17.82; P = 0.03), and history of surgery (OR = 8.68; 95% CI: 1.04–72.15; P = 0.04).

This is the first study on the seroepidemiology of T. gondii infection in women with a history of stillbirths in Mexico. The association of T. gondii exposure with a history of surgery warrants for further research. Risk factors for T. gondii infection found in the present survey may help to design optimal educational programs to avoid T. gondii infection.

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