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Athleta Christi

Political propaganda in the art patronage of Tamás Erdődy, Ban of Croatia and Slavonia

Author: Orsolya Bubryák

Count Tamás Erdődy (1558–1624), Ban of Slavonia and Croatia, one of the leading knights bannerets in the Kingdom of Hungary, pursued an illustrious political career: at different stages of his life he held several high offices of state, he was a successful participant in the fight against the Ottomans, he enjoyed the unconditional confidence of the Habsburg rulers, and he was nominated four times to the post of palatine, the highest position in the land, second only to the king. As a patron of the arts he was quick to recognise the potential power of visual devices. His support for the arts was closely connected to his political activities, and the works he commissioned, including the building work carried out on his estates, all played a part in his political ambitions and were linked to particular stages of his career. In his campaign to be elected palatine, he defined himself as Christ’s victorious warrior, a hero defending both his nation and the Christian faith. This was reflected in his chosen motto, “In Deo vici,” with its allusions to Constantine the Great; it was proven by the military title bestowed upon him, as a knight of the Order of the Precious Blood of our Saviour Jesus Christ of Mantua; and this image was reinforced by the heroic pictures of him, and by the posthumous portraits painted after them. Though it failed to achieve its political objective – for Erdődy never became palatine – the complex programme of patronage he followed, rare in the extreme in the Kingdom of Hungary in the early modern period, still dominates the way we regard this eminent nobleman.

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Kunstkammer in Schrift und Bild.

Johann Septimius Jörgers (1594–1676) „Kunststube“ in Nürnberg

Author: Orsolya Bubryák

Kunstkammer in Word and Image. The ‘Kunststube’ of Johann Septimius Jörger (1594–1676) in Nuremberg. The Kunstkammer of Johann Septimius Jörger in Nuremberg, created in the middle of the 1630s and dispersed only after 1676, is not among the well-known collections of the 17th century. It is not mentioned in the correspondence of famous art collectors, nor is it recorded in the travelogues of the time. Only sporadic information is available about the works of art that had been kept in the Kunstkammer. We regard the owner as an art collector because of a watercolour in the collection of prints and drawings of the University Library of Erlangen, in which the Nuremberg painter Michael Herr (1591–1661) depicted the interior of Jörger’s Kunstkammer. The present contribution aims to enrich our knowledge of this collection based on two new sources, namely a visual representation (cabinet painting) and an inventory of the Kunstkammer drawn up in 1667.

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Summary

The study deals with the two most important elements of the patronage of György Lipót Erdődy, namely his pious activity and the orders relating the cult of the family ancestors. György Erdődy, being the heir of an ancient Hungarian aristocratic family, has founded the new branch of the family in 1720 and from that time the center of the estates has become Galgóc (Hlohovec, now Slovakia). Count Erdődy has reconstructed the castle as a pseudo-Stammburg of the Erdődy family in the light of the legitimation program of the new branch. In its inner decoration there were the portraits, family trees and art pieces of the ancestors. It was Erdődy's father-in-law, prince Pál Esterházy who could have served as a model for him. The prince has created with a similar attitude a complex program of patronage for the cult of his ancestors. Although count Erdődy could not escape from the influence of the representation of palatine Esterházy, it can be still observed that the first was open for the new ideas of his age too. Erdődy has created a program based on archival research with a modern attitude instead of Esterházy's family history imbued with legends. The key element in his pious activity, just as in the case of his father-in-law Esterházy, was the cult of Virgin Mary. Erdődy has assisted more pilgrimage centers, like the pilgrimage church of Celldömölk, founded as a filiale of Mariazell. Erdődy has also founded a new pilgrimage site in his own castle after having moved the main altar of the cathedral of Pozsony (Bratislava) to Galgóc. This late gothic wooden altar is known today as the Nativity of Galgóc. György Lipót Erdődy's patronage, emerging mainly from the 1740's, demonstrates clearly the afterlife of the 17th

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