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The last period at the Aquincum Civil Town has long been a matter of dispute. Earlier researchers presumed a fourth century occupation phase at the settlement. However, re-examining these previous data (including an inscription, a coin hoard, walls, coins and several other finds of excavation contexts and even the “dark-earth” phenomenon) and analyzing the results of recent researches show that there is an obvious paucity of Late Roman finds. What is more, these results even show that most of them turn out to be third century finds. Based on the above mentioned, we can get to the conclusion, that the latest observable period in the Civil Town falls in the middle-end of the third century, or to the beginning of the fourth century at latest. Such an early abandonment of the Aquincum Civil Town is not unparalleled among Pannonian and other Western Roman provincial towns. And why was the Aquincum Civil Town abandoned relatively early? The reasons might be sought in the, by that time, already deteriorated fortifications and the loss of markets. No further (systematic) use could be demonstrated here in layers, finds, or constructions. Nevertheless, since a few fourth century finds still occur, the possibility cannot be excluded that certain areas were still sporadically used, particularly when buildings were mainly mined for spolia.

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Neues zur Urbanistik der Zivilstädte von Aquincum-Budapest und Carnuntum-Petronell

Auswertung und archäologische Interpretation der geophysikalischen Messungen 2011 und 2012

Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Authors:
Stefan Groh
,
Orsolya Láng
,
Helga Sedlmayer
, and
Paula Zsidi

In this paper the new results of an Austrian-Hungarian research cooperation (2011–2014) on the urbanism of the Civil towns of Aquincum and Carnuntum are to be presented. In synthesis of geophysical surveys, the interpretation of archaeological excavations and the reinterpretation of elder evidences, a new picture of the diachronic development of the two Civil Towns from an early vicus to a fortified city can be drawn.

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Krisztina Nagy
,
Orsolya Láng
,
Júlia Láng
,
Katalin Perczel-Kovách
,
Szabolcs Gyulai-Gaál
,
Kristóf Kádár
,
László Kőhidai
, and
Gábor Varga

Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) possess extensive regeneration potential. However, their therapeutic application demands a scaffold with appropriate properties. HydroMatrix (HydM) is a novel injectable peptide nanofiber hydrogel developed recently for cell culture. Our aim was to test whether HydM would be a suitable scaffold for proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. PDLSCs were seeded on non-coated or HydM-coated surfaces. Both real-time impedance analysis and cell viability assay documented cell growth on HydM. PDLSCs showed healthy, fibroblast-like morphology on the hydrogel. After a 3-week-long culture in osteogenic medium, mineralization was much more intense in HydM cultures compared to control. Alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells grown on the gels reached the non-coated control levels. Our data provided evidence that PDLSCs can adhere, survive, migrate, and proliferate on HydM and this gel also supports their osteogenic differentiation. We first applied impedimetry for dental stem cells cultured on a scaffold. HydM is ideal for in vitro studies of PDLSCs. It may also serve not only as a reference material but also in the future as a promising biocompatible scaffold for preclinical studies.

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