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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Petra Zenke, Á. Maróti-Agóts, Zs. Pádár, and L. Zöldág

Demand for correct and cost-effective genetic-based identification and parentage control has increasing importance in domestic animals, including dogs. In our study the applicability of a canine hyperpolymorphic microsatellite marker — which localized in the WILMS-TF (tumor factor) gene — was examined in mixed breed and purebred canine populations. The redesigned and shortened amplicons were genotyped using an allelic ladder which was constructed from sequence verified fragments. The nomenclature for allele calling based on repetition structures is suitable for international comparisons. Our study justified the potential use and efficiency of the marker D18S12 in parentage control.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: András Gáspárdy, Viktoria Holly, Petra Zenke, Ákos Maróti-Agóts, László Sáfár, Ágnes Bali Papp, and Endre Kovács

The authors studied the present status of Hungarian indigenous sheep breeds based on the genetic background of scrapie resistance. The aim of this investigation was to estimate the relative frequency of prion haplotypes, genotypes and risk categories, as well as to reveal the efficiency of the scrapie eradication programme achieved over the last decade. A novel approach in the characterisation of prion by using its genic variation was also implemented. The authors established that the proportion of deleterious sites (%) can be a useful indicator of the eradication programme. Based on a large sample size, it was confirmed that the scrapie resistance of the Cikta breed is low, and the classification of this breed according to risk category has not improved. However, the frequent genotype ARQ and risk category 3 can also be considered characteristic of the breed. The careful use of these genotypes is permitted and will contribute to the maintenance of breed diversity. The response of prion genic variation to selection for scrapie resistance in the other breeds (Tsigai, Milking Tsigai, White Racka, Black Racka and Gyimes Racka) was definitely successful.

Open access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Zsófia Pelles, András Gáspárdy, László Zöldág, Xénia Lénárt, Nóra Ninausz, László Varga, and Petra Zenke

A retrotransposon insertion in the SILV gene is associated with a peculiar phenotype of dog, known as a merle. It is characterised by various areas of their coat colour becoming diluted due to a malfunction in the eumelanin-producing pigment cells. Recent studies have shown that the exact size of the short interspersed element (SINE) insertion is in correlation with specific phenotypic attributes, but was not able to absolutely confine dogs to a certain colour pattern. Our study focused on the merle variations occurring in the Mudi breed. Altogether, 123 dog samples from 11 countries were tested and genotyped. The exact length of the merle alleles were determined by automated fluorescent capillary fragment analysis. The most frequent merle genotype in this Mudi sample collection was the ‘classic’ merle (m/M: 61.8%), whereas other variants, such as atypical (m/Ma and m/Ma+: 5.7%), harlequin (m/Mh: 13.8%), double merle (M/M: 0.8%) and mosaic profiles (17.9%) were also observed. The practical significance of testing this mutation is that, phenotypically, not only merle dogs are carriers of this insertion, but also the so-called hidden merle individuals (where the merle phenotype is fully covered by the pheomelanin-dominated colouration) are potentially capable of producing unintentionally homozygous ‘double merle’ progeny with ophthalmologic, viability and auditory impairments.

Open access
Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Á. Maróti-Agóts, I. Bodó, L. Jávorka, Alice Gyurmán, N. Solymosi, Petra Zenke, Marita Skogseth, and L. Zöldág

The synthesis of Heat Shock Protein 70.2 mRNA is also regulated by the Upper Promoter elements of the gene. This promoter region is polymorphic in cattle. These polymorphisms have a major effect on the activity of the mRNA transcription. In a comparison of quantity of transcribed mRNA from the wild type and AP2 mutant allele the wild type can produce 2–3-fold more transcripts.The Hungarian Grey Cattle (HG) and Norwegian Red (NFR) as control breed were genotyped with PCR-RFLP method. Our results showed that the frequencies of alleles in breeds (p(wt)HG = 0.859419, p(wt)NFR = 0.5) are different. The effective response to heat stress in the Norwegian Red seems to be less important than in the Hungarian Grey breed. The extensive keeping in hot and arid region during centuries could have been proved as selection pressure for the heat tolerance.Our results combined with the global climate forecasts emphasize the role of autochthonous, well adopted, heat tolerant breeds in the near future.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Boglárka Vincze, Márta Varga, Orsolya Kutasi, Petra Zenke, Ottó Szenci, Ferenc Baska, Alan Bartels, Sándor Spisák, Sándor Cseh, and Norbert Solymosi

Abstract

Equine grass sickness (also known as dysautonomia) is a life-threatening polyneuropathic disease affecting horses with approx. 80% mortality. Since its first description over a century ago, several factors, such as the phenotype, intestinal microbiome, environment, management and climate, have been supposed to be associated with the increased risk of dysautonomia. In this retrospective study, we examined the possible involvement of genetic factors. Medical and pedigree datasets regarding 1,233 horses with 49 affected animals born during a 23-year period were used in the analysis. Among the descendants of some stallions, the proportion of animals diagnosed with dysautonomia was unexpectedly high. Among males, the odds of dysautonomia were found to be higher, albeit not significantly, than among females. Significant familial clustering (genealogical index of familiality, P = 0.001) was observed among the affected animals. Further subgroups were identified with significant (P < 0.001) aggregation among close relatives using kinship-based methods. Our analysis, along with the slightly higher disease frequency in males, suggests that dysautonomia may have a genetic causal factor with an X-linked recessive inheritance pattern. This is the first study providing ancestry data and suggesting a heritable component in the likely multifactorial aetiology of the disease.

Open access