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Abstract

Correlation of scattered ignimbrite occurrences is crucial in the context of stratigraphy and the volcanic history of an area. In 2007, two papers were published concerning the classification of the volcanic rocks of the Bükkalja volcanic field. The interpretation of these papers shows an apparent contradiction in the age of the ignimbrite, which crops out at Tibolddaróc and Harsány. This paper attempts to resolve this contradiction. We show that the Harsány ignimbrite defined by Lukács et al. (2007) was indeed formed at 13.5 Ma and is not the same as was described by Márton et al. (2007). We redefine the possible locations of the Harsány and Tibolddaróc samples of Márton et al. (2007). The Tibolddaróc sample could represent the ash flow unit in the middle part of the Tibolddaróc volcanic section, whereas the Harsány sample could be derived from the ‘Harsány-bend’ outcrop. Both rocks have different geochemical character compared to the Harsány ignimbrite. This work emphasizes the usefulness of geochemical correlation of scattered rhyolitic ignimbrites, combined with detailed volcanological field observations.

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Bevezetés: A szépségiparban dolgozók szakmájuk által a szépség közvetítőivé válnak. Cél: A szerzők arra a kérdésre keresték a választ, hogy a szépségiparban dolgozók fokozott kockázattal rendelkeznek-e evés- és testképzavarok kialakulására. Módszerek: Az evészavarok vizsgálatára az Evési Attitűdök Teszt és az Evészavartünetek Súlyossági Skálája, míg a testkép vizsgálatára az Emberalakrajzok Teszt és az Evészavar Kérdőív testtel való elégedetlenség alskálája, valamint a Testi Attitűdök Teszt és a Testtel Kapcsolatos Befektetések Skálája szolgált. A kérdőíveket összesen 266 (18–26 éves) személy töltötte ki. Közülük 56 erdélyi és 59 magyarországi szépségipari dolgozó volt. A kontrollcsoportot 57 erdélyi és 54 magyarországi személy alkotta. Eredmények: A testsúlycsökkentő viselkedések közül a falásroham gyakoribb volt a szépségiparban dolgozóknál, mint a kontrollcsoportban. Az Evési Attitűdök Tesztben a küszöbértéket meghaladó esetek száma gyakoribb volt a szépségiparban dolgozóknál, mint a kontrollcsoportban. Következtetés: A klinikai és szubklinikai súlyosságú evészavarok gyakoribbnak bizonyultak a szépségiparban dolgozók csoportjában. Orv. Hetil., 2013, 154, 665–670.

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Abstract

The 13.5 Ma Harsány ignimbrite, in the eastern part of the Bükkalja volcanic field, eastern-central Europe, provides a rare example of mingled rhyolite. It consists of two distinct pumice populations (‘A’- and ‘B’-type) that can be recognized only by detailed geochemical work. The pumice and the host ignimbrite have a similar mineral assemblage involving quartz, plagioclase, biotite and sporadic Kfeldspar. Zircon, allanite, apatite and ilmenite occur as accessory minerals. The distinct pumice types are recognized by their different trace element compositions and the different CaO contents of their groundmass glasses. Plagioclase has an overlapping composition; however, biotite shows bimodal composition. Based on trace element and major element modeling, a derivation of ‘A’-type rhyolite magma from the ‘B’-type magma by fractional crystallization is excluded. Thus, the two pumice types represent two isolated rhyolite magma batches, possibly residing in the same crystal mush. Coeval remobilization of the felsic magmas might be initiated by intrusion of hot basaltic magma into the silicic magma reservoir The rapid ascent of the foaming rhyolite magmas enabled only a short-lived interaction and thus, a syn-eruptive mingling between the two magma batches.

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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Réka Lukács, György Czuppon, Szabolcs Harangi, Csaba Szabó, Theodor Ntaflos and Friedrich Koller

Silicate melt inclusions are frequent in the phenocryst phases (quartz, plagioclase, orthopyroxene, ilmenite and accessory minerals) of the Miocene silicic pyroclastic rocks of the Bükkalja Volcanic Field, Northern Hungary. These melt inclusions were trapped at different stages of magma evolution; therefore, they provide important information on the petrogenetic processes. The melt inclusions in the Bükkalja pyroclastic rocks show various textures such as (1) wholly enclosed type; (2) hourglass inclusions and (3) reentrant or embayment glass. Among the wholly enclosed type melt inclusions further textural subgroups can be distinguished based on their shape: negative crystal, rounded, elongated and irregular shaped. These various textures reflect differences in the time of entrapment prior to eruption and in the post-entrapment condition in the magma chamber. The largest textural variation was found in the quartz-hosted melt inclusions. However, the major element compositions of these melt inclusions do not differ from one another in the same unit. In general, compositions of the melt inclusions are similar to the chemistry of the glass shards. Comparing the composition of the quartz-hosted melt inclusions from three main ignimbrite units (Lower, Middle and Harsány Ignimbrite Units), slight differences have been recognized, suggesting distinct erupted host magmas. Melt inclusions from the andesitic lithic clast of the Lower Ignimbrite Unit could represent heterogeneous interstitial melt in the crystal mush zone at the magma chamber wall. The largest geochemical variation was found in the melt inclusion of the Middle Ignimbrite Unit, even in single samples. This compositional variation overlaps that of the rhyolitic juvenile clasts, but does not match that of the glasses of scoria clasts. We suggest that syn-eruptive magma mixing (mingling) occurred in a compositionally heterogeneous magma chamber of the Middle Ignimbrite Unit.

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Abstract

Permian felsic volcanic rocks were encountered in petroleum exploration boreholes in SE Hungary (eastern Pannonian Basin, Tisza Mega-unit, Békés–Codru Unit) during the second half of the 20th century. They were considered to be predominantly lavas (the so-called “Battonya quartz-porphyry”) and were genetically connected to the underlying “Battonya granite.” New petrographic observations, however, showed that the presumed lavas are crystal-poor (8–20 vol%) rhyolitic ignimbrites near Battonya and resedimented pyroclastic or volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in the Tótkomlós and the Biharugra areas, respectively. The studied ignimbrites are usually massive, matrix-supported, fiamme-bearing lapilli tuffs with eutaxitic texture as a result of welding processes. Some samples lack vitroclastic matrix and show low crystal breakage, but consist of oriented, devitrified fiammes as well. Textural features suggest that the latter are high-grade rheomorphic ignimbrites.

Felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary belong to the Permian volcanic system of the Tisza Mega-unit; however, they show remarkable petrographic differences as compared to the other Permian felsic volcanic rocks of the mega-unit. In contrast to the crystal-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites of SE Hungary with rare biotite, the predominantly rhyodacitic–dacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Tisza Mega-unit are crystal-rich (40–45 vol%) and often contain biotite, pyroxene, and garnet. Additionally, some geochemical and geochronological differences between them were also observed by previous studies. Therefore, the Permian felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary might represent the most evolved, crystal-poor rhyolitic melt of a large-volume felsic (rhyodacitic–dacitic) volcanic system.

The Permian volcanic rocks of the studied area do not show any evident correlations with either the Permian felsic ignimbrites in the Finiş Nappe (Apuseni Mts, Romania), as was supposed so far, or the similar rocks in any nappe of the Codru Nappe System. Moreover, no relevant plutonic–volcanic connection was found between the studied samples and the underlying “Battonya granite.”

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Abstract

Permian felsic volcanic rocks were encountered in petroleum exploration boreholes in SE Hungary (eastern Pannonian Basin, Tisza Mega-unit, Békés–Codru Unit) during the second half of the 20th century. They were considered to be predominantly lavas (the so-called “Battonya quartz-porphyry”) and were genetically connected to the underlying “Battonya granite.” New petrographic observations, however, showed that the presumed lavas are crystal-poor (8–20 vol%) rhyolitic ignimbrites near Battonya and resedimented pyroclastic or volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in the Tótkomlós and the Biharugra areas, respectively. The studied ignimbrites are usually massive, matrix-supported, fiamme-bearing lapilli tuffs with eutaxitic texture as a result of welding processes. Some samples lack vitroclastic matrix and show low crystal breakage, but consist of oriented, devitrified fiammes as well. Textural features suggest that the latter are high-grade rheomorphic ignimbrites.

Felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary belong to the Permian volcanic system of the Tisza Mega-unit; however, they show remarkable petrographic differences as compared to the other Permian felsic volcanic rocks of the mega-unit. In contrast to the crystal-poor rhyolitic ignimbrites of SE Hungary with rare biotite, the predominantly rhyodacitic–dacitic pyroclastic rocks of the Tisza Mega-unit are crystal-rich (40–45 vol%) and often contain biotite, pyroxene, and garnet. Additionally, some geochemical and geochronological differences between them were also observed by previous studies. Therefore, the Permian felsic volcanic rocks in SE Hungary might represent the most evolved, crystal-poor rhyolitic melt of a large-volume felsic (rhyodacitic–dacitic) volcanic system.

The Permian volcanic rocks of the studied area do not show any evident correlations with either the Permian felsic ignimbrites in the Finiş Nappe (Apuseni Mts, Romania), as was supposed so far, or the similar rocks in any nappe of the Codru Nappe System. Moreover, no relevant plutonic–volcanic connection was found between the studied samples and the underlying “Battonya granite.”

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