Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: R. Rathore x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Three chemically different samples (Ti∶Mo ratios 1∶2, 1∶1 and 2∶1) of titanium molybdate have been prepared by mixing the solutions of titanium(IV) chloride (M/40), titanium sulphate (M/20, M/40) and sodium molybdate (M/20, M/40) in different volume ratios. Dehydration studies have been completed, which would seem to throw some light on the state of the water molecules present in the samples.

Restricted access

Abstract  

From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium Cs+(aq) + A(aq) + 1(nb) ⇆ 1·Cs+(nb) + A (nb) taking part in the two-phase water–nitrobenzene system (A = picrate, 1 = hexaarylbenzene-based receptor; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was evaluated as log K ex (1·Cs+, A) = 2.8 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the hexaarylbenzene-based receptor·Cs+ complex (abbrev. 1·Cs+) in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log β nb (1·Cs+) = 4.7 ± 0.1. By using quantum mechanical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the 1·Cs+ complex species was solved. In this complex having C 3 symmetry, the cation Cs+ synergistically interacts with the polar ethereal oxygen fence and with the central hydrophobic benzene bottom via cation–π interaction. Finally, the calculated binding energy of the resulting complex 1·Cs+ is −220.0 kJ/mol, confirming relatively high stability of the considered cationic complex species.

Restricted access

Abstract  

From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium C +(aq) + Cs+(nb)
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\rightleftarrows$$ \end{document}
C+(nb) + Cs+(aq) taking place in the two-phase water–nitrobenzene system (C+ = organic cation, 1 = hexaarylbenzene-based receptor; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the C+ cationic complex species in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated.
Restricted access

Abstract  

From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+(aq) + 1·Cs+(nb)
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\rightleftarrows$$ \end{document}
1·M+(nb) + Cs+(aq) taking part in the two-phase water–nitrobenzene system (1 = hexaarylbenzene-based receptor; M+ = H3O+, NH4 +, Ag+, K+, Rb+, Tl+; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complex species in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the series of Rb+ < K+ < Ag+, Tl+ < H3O+, NH4 +.
Restricted access
Cereal Research Communications
Authors:
R. Ponnuswamy
,
A. Rathore
,
A. Vemula
,
R.R. Das
,
A.K. Singh
,
D. Balakrishnan
,
H.S. Arremsetty
,
R.B. Vemuri
, and
T. Ram

The All India Coordinated Rice Improvement Project of ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research, Hyderabad organizes multi-location testing of elite lines and hybrids to test and identify new rice cultivars for the release of commercial cultivation in India. Data obtained from Initial Hybrid Rice Trials of three years were utilized to understand the genotype × environment interaction (GEI) patterns among the test locations of five different agro-ecological regions of India using GGE and AMMI biplot analysis. The combined analysis of variance and AMMI ANOVA for a yield of rice hybrids were highly significant for GEI. The GGE biplots first two PC explained 54.71%, 51.54% and 59.95% of total G + GEI variation during 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively, whereas AMMI biplot PC1 and PC2 explained 46.62% in 2010, 36.07% in 2011 and 38.33% in 2012 of the total GEI variation. Crossover interactions, i.e. genotype rank changes across locations were observed. GGE biplot identified hybrids, viz. PAN1919, TNRH193, DRH005, VRH639, 26P29, Signet5051, KPH385, VRH667, NIPH101, SPH497, RH664 Plus and TNRH222 as stable rice hybrids. The discriminative locations identified in different test years were Coimbatore, Maruteru, VNR, Jammu, Raipur, Ludhiana, Karjat and Dabhoi. The AMMI1 biplot identified the adaptable rice hybrids viz., CNRH102, DRH005, NK6303, NK6320, DRRH78, NIPH101, Signet5050, BPH115, Bio452, NPSH2003, and DRRH83. The present study demonstrated that AMMI and GGE biplots analyses were successful in assessing genotype by environment interaction in hybrid rice trials and aided in the identification of stable and adaptable rice hybrids with higher mean and stable yields.

Restricted access
Cereal Research Communications
Authors:
H. Khan
,
S.C. Bhardwaj
,
O.P. Gangwar
,
P. Prasad
,
P.L. Kashyap
,
S. Savadi
,
S. Kumar
, and
R. Rathore

A set of forty wheat cultivars comprising bread wheat, durum and triticale identified during 2010–2014 were tested for resistance to Indian pathotypes of leaf, stem and yellow rusts at seedling stage under controlled conditions. Eight Lr genes (Lr1, Lr3, Lr10, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr23, Lr24 and Lr26) were characterized based on differential interactions with specific rust races. Genes Lr23, Lr26 and Lr13 conferred leaf rust resistance in most of the accessions. Three Yr genes (YrA, Yr2 and Yr9) were inferred in 40 genotypes, where Yr2 followed by Yr9 were most frequent in conferring stripe rust resistance. Ten Sr genes, namely, Sr2, Sr5, Sr8a, Sr7b, Sr9b, Sr9e, Sr11, Sr13, Sr24 and Sr31, were postulated in these lines with predominance of Sr11, Sr31 and Sr2. These Lr, Sr and Yr genes were observed singly or in combination. Robust DNA markers were used to identify adult plant resistance genes Yr18/Lr34/Sr57, Lr68 and Sr2 and all stage resistance genes Lr24/Sr24, Sr28 and Yr9/Lr26/Sr31. STS marker iag95 showed presence of Yr9 in four additional cultivars which were resistant to one or more rusts. Gene Sr28 was identified in seven durum cultivars with the wPt7004 marker. This is first report of Sr28 being present in many Indian wheat cultivars. CsGs-STS marker identified Lr68 in nine cultivars.

Restricted access