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  • Author or Editor: Rose Holtzman x
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Abstract

Experimental investigations of laminated timber-concrete and steel-timber-concrete composite floor or bridge beams show that complex failure modes develop in such members. This paper presents acoustic emission investigation results that reveal the development of the failure modes in the steel-timber-concrete composite specimens subjected to short-term static ramp-loading. Accelerometers connected to a four channel dynamic signal analyzer continuously monitored the beam specimens during the load tests. Conventional techniques can be used for time domain data acquisition and evaluation of acoustic emission events generated in the structural member investigated, which contain thousands of independent signals to be processed, even if only in the audible frequency range. While the wavelet series of detected acoustic emission signals in the time domain produce a reliable amount of statistical information about the number and intensity of events, a frequency - time domain visualization may facilitate an advanced interpretation on the basis of spectrogram analysis. With on-site collection of data the methodology could allow for structural monitoring.

Open access

Abstract

This paper is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Miklós Iványi, who instilled in the authors an appreciation for experimental investigations, which are foundational to understanding material and structural behavior. Timber-concrete composite structures are increasingly adopted for new buildings due to their favorable sustainability parameters and the increased availability of cross laminated timber. For larger spans, however, solid timber floors lead to higher timber volumes and the use of glulam beams may become necessary for a more efficient use of wood. This paper presents laboratory tests of glulam-concrete composite beams and is the first in a series of two papers on investigating the associated failure mechanisms. Three full-scale glulam-concrete beam specimens were studied. The glulam and concrete are monolithically interconnected using a continuous layer of adhesive. Shear reinforcement was added to the glulam beams to allow for failure mode control. Static load tests to failure were conducted along with acoustic emission monitoring to track the progression of the failure. The results indicate that the shear reinforcement of the glulam layer affects the load capacity of the composite beam through shifting the failure from a shear to a tension failure mode. Similar glulam-concrete beams can enable larger span applications for buildings and bridges while maintaining an attractive sustainability performance.

Open access