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Rapid urbanization has resulted in temperature differences between the urban area and its surrounding areas. Academics have called this as the urban heat island phenomenon. Among the places that have seen rapid urbanization is the City of Cebu. The Philippine’s oldest street, Colon, was chosen as the study area due to the near absence of vegetation and closely spaced buildings. Buildings that are spaced more closely as well as multiple absorptions and reflections produce higher and more viable street temperatures. This study tries to systematically understand the urban heat island effect between Colon and Lawaan, the rural area defined in this study. In order to quantify the urban heat island between two given locations, the mobile traverse method during the summer time, for a 10-day period in May 2016. A digital thermometer measuring platform was mounted on top of a vehicle to measure the different temperatures of Colon Street. Urban temperatures were also gathered in the Lawaan area using the same device. Preliminary results showed the presence of the urban heat island phenomenon between the two areas (ΔT =1.17 °C). The provision of green spaces and proper urban planning are essential in mitigating future urban heat stress due to anthropogenic changes of existing cities.

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This study exhibits the use of participatory design in the development of a community housing project for the twelve family members of the Donnaville Homeowners Association in Barangay 177, Caloocan City, Philippines. All families have been living as informal settlers of which portions of it were considered unsafe due to recurrent flooding during heavy rains. The housing project study was part of a workshop initiated by members of the Community Architecture Network. In order to achieve this methodology, the community architects arranged workshops between members of the families. The members were divided into teams that worked separately and then collectively identify strategies in improving the design and layout of the housing unit according to the needs of each family. The teams identified various interventions in order to effectively reduce the cost of each new unit. Finally, through comprehensive discussions and exchanges between the members, the resulting layout and schematic design of the housing unit were achieved that was desirable to the families. By using participatory design in the development of a project, in this case, a community housing unit, user acceptance is therefore increased and rejection is reduced by the stakeholders.

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Pollack Periodica
Authors: Gantumur Tsovoodavaa, Rowell Ray Lim Shih, Mohammad Reza Ganjali Bonjar, and István Kistelegdi

Over the course of human history, vernacular architecture has developed according to the climate, culture, geographical conditions and lifestyle. One of the fascinating designs from around the world that have survived over the years is the yurt. Although it has developed over thousands of years, the basic round form of the yurt remains unchanged. Nomadic people have traditionally utilized the yurt because due to its portability, lightness and can be erected easily. This unique architectural structure allowed the nomadic tribes to live and thrive in the harsh Central Asian climate. In this study, the history, design, and construction of the traditional yurt are reviewed and also proofed whether literature about the building physics performance of the yurt still exists.

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Evacuation centers play a vital role for natural disaster-prone countries like the Philippines. In the Philippines, a public school building serves as temporary evacuation centers for the displaced families. This study presents the design and methodology of blackboard modular furniture that can be converted to an emergency partition and storage for emergency provisions. These modular partitions provide a sense of privacy for each of the affected families, which are needed in any evacuation centers, particularly on the sick, aged, menstruating women and lactating mothers, among others. By using the participative design method, the design will therefore ensure user acceptability by the stakeholders. The resulting design allows for adaptability and portability, which therefore reduce material waste and cost. The final design was the product of the both participatory design approach while following the guidelines of the Department of Education of the Philippines.

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Pollack Periodica
Authors: Chu Xiaohui, Ganjali Bonjar Mohammad Reza, Gantumur Tsovoodavaa, Rowell Ray Lim Shih, and Balint Baranyai

Along with its rapid growth in economy, the protection of heritage buildings has recently gained importance and awareness in China. This paper investigates the energy performance of a heritage building (Wang’s House) in Shanghai, as well as the thermal comfort of the users, using dynamic thermal simulations. The analysis showed that heating accounts as the highest energy demand, followed by cooling and lighting. The resulting study will help the authors to identify various sustainable strategies to improve users comfort as well as reduce the energy demand of heritage buildings in China.

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