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  • Author or Editor: Runping Han x
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Abstract  

In this paper, the sorption properties of manganese oxide coated sand (MOCS) towards uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions were studied in a batch adsorption system. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared (IR) analyses were used to characterize MOCS. Parameters affecting the adsorption of uranium(VI), such as the contact time, salt concentration, competitive ions, temperature and initial uranium(VI) concentration, were investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson models using nonlinear regressive analysis. The results indicated that the Langmuir and Redlich–Peterson models provided the best correlation of experimental data. The kinetic experimental data were analyzed using three kinetic equations including pseudo-first order equation, pseudo-second order equation and intraparticle diffusion model to examine the mechanism of adsorption and potential rate-controlling step. The process mechanism was found to be complex, consisting of both surface adsorption and pore diffusion. The effective diffusion parameter D i values estimated in the order of 10−7 cm2 s−1 indicated that the intraparticle diffusion was not the rate-controlling step. Thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous, endothermic process. Adsorbed U(VI) ions were desorbed effectively (about 94.7%) by 0.1 mol L−1 HNO3. The results indicated that MOCS can be used as an effective adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with U(VI) ions.

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Abstract  

A continuous fixed-bed study was carried out by using zeolite as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution under the effect of various process parameters such as the pH the bed depth, the flow rate, the presence of salt and the initial U(VI) ion concentration. The U(VI) ion uptake by zeolite increased with initial U(VI) ion concentration and bed height, but decreased as the flow rate increased. The adsorption capacity reached a maximum at pH of 6.0. A shorter breakthrough time was observed in the presence of salt. The experimental data obtained from the breakthrough curves were analyzed using the Thomas model. The BDST model was also applied to predict the service times for other flow rates and initial concentrations. The results showed that the Thomas model was suitable for the description of the whole breakthrough curve, while the data were in good agreement with the BDST model. The columns were regenerated by eluting the bound U(VI) ions with 0.1 mol L−1 NaHCO3 solution after the adsorption studies. After desorption and regeneration with deionized water, zeolite could be reused to adsorb uranium(VI) at a comparable capacity.

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