Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: S. Scott x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

The characterization of radioactive hazardous waste, also known as transuranic "mixed waste" has to be completed before it can be classified for proper treatment (incinerator, mechanical compaction or thermal treatment), packing, and transport. The characterization of the TRU mixed waste is not only complex process but rather an expensive undertaking. The process knowledge is the basic foundation of characterization. It is the documented knowledge of processes and materials that generated the waste. The transuranic waste Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) defines the Data Quality Objectives (DQO's) and provides the scope of analytical parameters and methods required to accurately characterize the radioactive mixed waste. Based on the historical data and process knowledge a sampling and analysis plan can be developed to characterize the radioactive hazardous waste. Based on the characterization, an assessment of the regulatory status can be made before the waste could be accepted for disposal at the WIPP facility. The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) developed by WIPP defines the parameters for receiving and final disposal of the TRU waste. The sets of criteria, such as: heat generated, fissile gram equivalent (FGE), plutonium-equivalent (PE) curies, and specifications of a dose rate have to be met before the waste is accepted for deep geological disposal. The characterization of radioactive waste becomes even more complex due to the presence of iron base metals/alloys, aluminum base metals/alloys, organic, chelating agents that are mixed with plastic, rubber, cellulose, soils and cement. Some of the modern characterization technologies that are under development and currently used for TRU mixed wastes are: nondestructive examination, nondestructive assay, headspace gas analysis, and drum coring for Resources Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) sampling.

Restricted access

The purpose of this work was to further investigate the regulatory interplay between pyrophosphate:fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase (PFP) and its positive effector, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P 2 ), in the storage organs of cold- and drought-stressed plants. Since there is no detectable cytoplasmic fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (cytFBPase) activity in the taproots of carrot plants, PFP is the only enzyme that can replace its function when stored starch is converted to transportable sucrose. The working hypothesis was that PFP is likely to be involved in the mobilisation of energy reserves and might have a special role in storage organs such as carrot taproots upon stress. Both cold and drought stress resulted in a marked increase in the endogenous Fru-2,6-P 2 levels. It is suggested that the significant changes in photosynthate allocation are the direct results of the stimulation of PFP activity by elevated Fru-2,6-P 2 levels. PFP stimulated by Fru-2,6-P 2 operated in the gluconeogenic direction in the taproots of stressed carrot plants, whereas the glycolytic direction was dominant in the non-stressed controls. This suggests that the metabolic status determining the net activity of PFP depends on the physiological stress situation, making PFP an important sensor of environmental changes. The experimental data indicated that PFP is involved in the mobilisation of energy reserves during unfavourable environmental changes by promoting the re-synthesis of transportable sucrose in taproots.

Restricted access

Abstract  

An electronic nose utilising an array of six-bulk acoustic wave polymer coated Piezoelectric Quartz (PZQ) sensors has been developed. The nose was presented with 346 samples of fresh edible oil headspace volatiles, generated at 45°C. Extra virgin olive (EVO), Non-virgin olive oil (OI) and Sunflower oil (SFO), were used over a period of 30 days. The sensor responses were then analysed producing an architecture for the Radial Basis Function Artificial Neural Network (RBF). It was found that the RBF results were excellent, giving classifications of above 99% for the vegetable oil test samples.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The effect of different relative humidity (RH) on the response of a six-polymer coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor based electronic nose (EN) was investigated, RH 30 and 50% respectively. Increases in the sensor responses were observed for an increase in RH. A stainless steel pre-concentration tube (PCT) containing Porapak-S and a nichrome heating element was developed to minimise the effect and allow for chromatographic pre-separation. Breakthrough times of chemical compounds through the PCT were experimentally determined and used to select a mixture of water and toluene as a suitable sample for pre-separation. The PCT was capable of separating the water from the toluene and the EN was competent at evaluating the concentration of toluene in the solution.

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: L. Sajo-Bohus, M. Scott, E. Greaves, L. Somervaille, S. Green, T. Avila, F. Loaiza, and L. Foglietta

Abstract  

Gamma-ray induced X-ray emission (GIXE) technique for elemental lead in-vivo tibial measurement using a large volume hyper pure germanium detector is presented with the most convenient source-sample-detector geometry. The system operates advantageously when several parameters are considered for a lower dead time operation. The detection limit (DL) is better that 3.5 μg/g of Ca. Results of in-vivo average tibial lead concentration for some of the monitored groups are: control 7 μg of lead per g of Ca; gasoline filling attendants 6 μg/g of Ca; custom office workers near the DL; industrial workers range from DL up to 84±3 μg/g of Ca, suggesting that lead accumulation in the bone does not represent a major health risk

Restricted access
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: L. Tandon, E. Hastings, J. Banar, J. Barnes, D. Beddingfield, D. Decker, J. Dyke, D. Farr, J. FitzPatrick, D. Gallimore, S. Garner, R. Gritzo, T. Hahn, G. Havrilla, B. Johnson, K. Kuhn, S. LaMont, D. Langner, C. Lewis, V. Majidi, P. Martinez, R. McCabe, S. Mecklenburg, D. Mercer, S. Meyers, V. Montoya, B. Patterson, R. Pereyra, D. Porterfield, J. Poths, D. Rademacher, C. Ruggiero, D. Schwartz, M. Scott, K. Spencer, R. Steiner, R. Villarreal, H. Volz, L. Walker, A. Wong, and C. Worley

Abstract  

The goal of nuclear forensics is to establish an unambiguous link between illicitly trafficked nuclear material and its origin. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Materials Signatures Program has implemented a graded “conduct of operations” type analysis flow path approach for determining the key nuclear, chemical, and physical signatures needed to identify the manufacturing process, intended use, and origin of interdicted nuclear material. This analysis flow path includes both destructive and non-destructive characterization techniques and has been exercized against different nuclear materials from LANL’s special nuclear materials archive. Results obtained from the case study will be presented to highlight analytical techniques that offer the critical attribution information.

Restricted access