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  • Author or Editor: S. Sekimoto x
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Abstract  

Chemical compositions of spherules separated from deep sea sediment dredged off Hawaiian islands and from Antarctic ice were measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Iron, cobalt, nickel, iridium, scandium and manganese contents in those spherules were determined to be 19.3–97.7%, 23–4370 mg·kg−1, 0.08–7.04%, 0.84–35.4 mg·kg−1, 1.4–44.3 mg·kg−1 and 93.4 mg·kg−1–7.2 %, respectively, and compared with each other. Particularly, iridium was detected in seven spherules among fourteen from Hawaii, but only one spherule among twenty-two from Antarctic, and those spherules turned out to be extraterrestrial in origin. However, it was shown that there was little difference in characteristics of elemental contents between both kinds of spherules, except for Ir-detected spherules.

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Abstract  

Chemical composition of 15 magnetic spherules collected from deep sea sediment was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) under two different irradiation conditions using the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Based on their chemical composition, nine spherules were judged to be of extraterrestrial origin. The differences in the chemical composition of the nine spherules are discussed in terms of condensation temperatures for the elements. Comparing the detection limits derived from INAA under two different irradiation conditions, the sensitivity for INAA using KUR is discussed.

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Abstract  

An online analytical system using ion chromatography (IC) followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed for the separate determination of I and IO3 in aqueous solutions with a detection limit 0.1–1 μg 1/1. The total iodine concentration was also directly determined by ICP-MS. Iodine in several environmental samples (i.e., rain, river water, brine, and soil solution) was successfully determined with information on its chemical form. The release of I into soil solution with decreasing Eh was observed in an incubation experiment with flooded soil. An iodine form other than I and IO3 was observed in several environmental samples.

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