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  • Author or Editor: S. Valcheva-Kuzmanova x
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Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) is rich in phenolic substances, mainly flavonoids and tannins. The influence of AMFJ (5 and 10 ml kg−1) on the gastrointestinal propulsion of charcoal meal in rats was investigated. AMFJ dose-dependently reduced the rate of intestinal transit and the effect was statistically significant at the dose of 10 ml kg−1. This reduction of the intestinal transit rate might be due to the the presence of flavonoids and tannins in the juice.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: S. Valcheva-Kuzmanova, V. Gadjeva, D. Ivanova, and A. Belcheva

Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) used in this experiment was very rich in phenolic substances, anthocyanins being the main flavonoid group. The antioxidant action of AMFJ was determined in vitro through measuring its Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD)-like activity and catalase (CAT)-like activity. The TEAC of AMFJ was 63±0.8 mM. The SOD-like activity of 1 ml AMFJ was equivalent to that of 230.3±8.4 U SOD and was equal to that of 12.3 mg L-ascorbic acid and 11.4 mg Trolox, respectively. The CAT-like activity of 1 ml AMFJ was equivalent to the activity of 3223.5±91.3 U CAT and was equal to that of 6.4 mg L-ascorbic acid, while Trolox did not show such an activity. The pronounced antioxidant action of AMFJ is probably due to its high content of phenolic compounds.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: S. Valcheva-Kuzmanova, M. Eftimov, R. Tashev, L. Yankova, I. Belcheva, and S. Belcheva

The main bioactive substances in Aronia melanocarpa fruit juice (AMFJ) are polyphenols (flavonoids, procyanidins, and phenolic acids). A great number of polyphenols are able to traverse the blood-brain barrier. In recent years more attention is drawn to the ability of these substances to influence central nervous system functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of AMFJ on exploratory behaviour and locomotor activity in male Wistar rats. AMFJ was administered orally for 7, 14, 21, and 30 days at three increasing doses (2.5, 5, and 10 ml kg−1). The changes in exploratory behaviour and locomotor activity were recorded in an Opto Varimex apparatus. It was found that the low doses of AMFJ (2.5 and 5 ml kg−1) for all treatment periods did not significantly affect exploratory behaviour and locomotor activity of rats compared to the saline-treated controls. AMFJ at the highest dose of 10 ml kg−1 had no significant effect on exploration and locomotion for the treatment periods of 7 and 14 days, while for the periods of 21 and 30 days it significantly decreased the number of horizontal and vertical movements, which might be the result of a sedative effect. At all the doses and testing periods, AMFJ did not disturb the progressive decrease in motor behaviour, suggesting habituation.

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