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Background

Potential concerns are increasing that smartphone and Internet addictions may have deleterious effects on the mental health. Despite the recognition of the important role that implicit associations may have over explicit processes in addiction, such implicit associations have not been comprehensively investigated with respect to Internet addiction. Therefore, we modified the Implicit Association Test (IAT) for smartphone and Internet addictions and investigated its validity in children and adolescents.

Methods

In this experimental study, 78 at-risk children and adolescents ranging in age from 7 to 17 years completed an IAT modified with pictures captured from the most popular Internet games among youth. Furthermore, measures of Internet and smartphone addictions, mental health and problem behaviors, impulsive tendencies, self-esteem, daily stress, and quality of life were assessed simultaneously.

Results

Significant correlations were found between IAT D2SD scores and standardized scales for Internet (r = .28, p < .05) and smartphone (r = .33, p < .01) addictions. There were no significant correlations between IAT parameters and other scales measuring the constructs that are less relevant to the features of addiction, such as daily stress levels, impulsivity, and quality of life. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the IAT D2SD was independently and positively associated with smartphone addiction (p = .03) after controlling for other clinical correlates.

Conclusions

This study demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity of this IAT as a novel measurement relating to Internet and smartphone addictions. Further longitudinal and prospective studies are needed to evaluate its potential utility in clinical and community settings.

Open access

Abstract

Background and aims

Problem gambling among adolescents has recently attracted attention because of easy access to gambling in online environments and its serious effects on adolescent lives. We proposed a machine learning-based analysis method for predicting the degree of problem gambling.

Methods

Of the 17,520 respondents in the 2018 National Survey on Youth Gambling Problems dataset (collected by the Korea Center on Gambling Problems), 5,045 students who had gambled in the past 3 months were included in this study. The Gambling Problem Severity Scale was used to provide the binary label information. After the random forest-based feature selection method, we trained four models: random forest (RF), support vector machine (SVM), extra trees (ETs), and ridge regression.

Results

The online gambling behavior in the past 3 months, experience of winning money or goods, and gambling of personal relationship were three factors exhibiting the high feature importance. All four models demonstrated an area under the curve (AUC) of >0.7; ET showed the highest AUC (0.755), RF demonstrated the highest accuracy (71.8%), and SVM showed the highest F1 score (0.507) on a testing set.

Discussion

The results indicate that machine learning models can convey meaningful information to support predictions regarding the degree of problem gambling.

Conclusion

Machine learning models trained using important features showed moderate accuracy in a large-scale Korean adolescent dataset. These findings suggest that the method will help screen adolescents at risk of problem gambling. We believe that expandable machine learning-based approaches will become more powerful as more datasets are collected.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Fatih Canan
,
Servet Karaca
,
Melike Düzgün
,
Ayşe Merve Erdem
,
Esranur Karaçaylı
,
Nur Begüm Topan
,
Sang-Kyu Lee
,
Zu Wei Zhai
,
Murat Kuloğlu
, and
Marc N. Potenza

Background and aims

The ratio of the second and fourth fingers (2D:4D ratio) is a sexually dimorphic trait, with men tending to have lower values than women. This ratio has been related to prenatal testosterone concentrations and addictive behaviors including problematic video-gaming. We aimed to investigate the possible association between 2D:4D ratios and Internet addiction and whether such a relationship would be independent of impulsivity.

Methods

A total of 652 university students (369 women, 283 men), aged 17–27 years, were enrolled in the study. Problematic and pathological Internet use (PPIU) was assessed using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT). The participants also completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11; BIS-11) and had their 2D:4D ratios measured.

Results

2D:4D ratios were not significantly different in women with PPIU and in those with adaptive Internet use (AIU). Men with PPIU exhibited lower 2D:4D ratios on both hands when compared with those with AIU. Correlation analysis revealed that 2D:4D ratios on both hands were negatively correlated with IAT scores among men, but not among women. The multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age, duration of weekly Internet use, impulsiveness, and 2D:4D ratios on the right hand were independently associated with IAT scores among men, and impulsivity did not mediate the relationship between 2D:4D ratios and PPIU.

Conclusions

For men, 2D:4D ratios on the right hand were inversely correlated with Internet addiction severity even after controlling for individual differences in impulsivity. These findings suggest that high prenatal testosterone levels may contribute to the occurrence of PPIU among men.

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Beáta Bőthe
,
Mónika Koós
,
Léna Nagy
,
Shane W. Kraus
,
Zsolt Demetrovics
,
Marc N. Potenza
,
Aurélie Michaud
,
Rafael Ballester-Arnal
,
Dominik Batthyány
,
Sophie Bergeron
,
Joël Billieux
,
Peer Briken
,
Julius Burkauskas
,
Georgina Cárdenas-López
,
Joana Carvalho
,
Jesús Castro-Calvo
,
Lijun Chen
,
Giacomo Ciocca
,
Ornella Corazza
,
Rita Csako
,
David P. Fernandez
,
Elaine F. Fernandez
,
Loïs Fournier
,
Hironobu Fujiwara
,
Johannes Fuss
,
Roman Gabrhelík
,
Ateret Gewirtz-Meydan
,
Biljana Gjoneska
,
Mateusz Gola
,
Joshua B. Grubbs
,
Hashim T. Hashim
,
Md. Saiful Islam
,
Mustafa Ismail
,
Martha C. Jiménez-Martínez
,
Tanja Jurin
,
Ondrej Kalina
,
Verena Klein
,
András Költő
,
Chih-Ting Lee
,
Sang-Kyu Lee
,
Karol Lewczuk
,
Chung-Ying Lin
,
Liverpool John Moores University's research team † Liverpool John Moores University's research team
,
Christine Lochner
,
Silvia López-Alvarado
,
Kateřina Lukavská
,
Percy Mayta-Tristán
,
Ionut Milea
,
Dan J. Miller
,
Oľga Orosová
,
Gábor Orosz
,
Sungkyunkwan University's research team †† Sungkyunkwan University's research team
,
Fernando P. Ponce
,
Gonzalo R. Quintana
,
Gabriel C. Quintero Garzola
,
Jano Ramos-Diaz
,
Kévin Rigaud
,
Ann Rousseau
,
Marco De Tubino Scanavino
,
Marion K. Schulmeyer
,
Pratap Sharan
,
Mami Shibata
,
Sheikh Shoib
,
Vera L. Sigre Leirós
,
Luke Sniewski
,
Ognen Spasovski
,
Vesta Steibliene
,
Dan J. Stein
,
Julian Strizek
,
Aleksandar Štulhofer
,
Berk C. Ünsal
, and
Marie-Pier Vaillancourt-Morel

Abstract

Background and aims

Despite its inclusion in the 11th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, there is a virtual paucity of high-quality scientific evidence about compulsive sexual behavior disorder (CSBD), especially in underrepresented and underserved populations. Therefore, we comprehensively examined CSBD across 42 countries, genders, and sexual orientations, and validated the original (CSBD-19) and short (CSBD-7) versions of the Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder Scale to provide standardized, state-of-the-art screening tools for research and clinical practice.

Method

Using data from the International Sex Survey (N = 82,243; M age = 32.39 years, SD = 12.52), we evaluated the psychometric properties of the CSBD-19 and CSBD-7 and compared CSBD across 42 countries, three genders, eight sexual orientations, and individuals with low vs. high risk of experiencing CSBD.

Results

A total of 4.8% of the participants were at high risk of experiencing CSBD. Country- and gender-based differences were observed, while no sexual-orientation-based differences were present in CSBD levels. Only 14% of individuals with CSBD have ever sought treatment for this disorder, with an additional 33% not having sought treatment because of various reasons. Both versions of the scale demonstrated excellent validity and reliability.

Discussion and conclusions

This study contributes to a better understanding of CSBD in underrepresented and underserved populations and facilitates its identification in diverse populations by providing freely accessible ICD-11-based screening tools in 26 languages. The findings may also serve as a crucial building block to stimulate research into evidence-based, culturally sensitive prevention and intervention strategies for CSBD that are currently missing from the literature.

Open access