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Abstract  

In this era of a rapid change in the way people finding and using information resources, despite that the academic communication and using patterns for people in the traditional print environment have been studied for many years, the Internet media presents a new and relatively unexplored area for such study. In this article, we explored the distribution and utilization of web recourses in humanities and social sciences based on web citations. We collected 1,421,731 citations listed in 148,172 articles from 493 journals published during the period of 2006–2007 in the CSSCI, which resulted in 44,973 web citations. We counted the amount and types of web resources used in various disciplines, analyzed the URLs frequency from the host-level, fitted the frequency distribution into the regression models with SPSS, and perform the disciplines coupling analysis based on the web citations. We found out that: (a) The distributions of web citations by years or by websites and webpage types are selective and regular; (b) Great disparity exists among various disciplines in terms of using web information, and the high-frequency websites; (c) The frequency distribution of web citations is similar to the Garfield’s citation distribution curve; (d) Some relationships between disciplines are detected, based on the utilization of web information.

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Abstract  

Over the past 30 years, the research behavior of Chinese scholars has continually evolved. This paper studied the citing behavior of Chinese scholars by employing three indicators of citation concentration from the perspective of citation breadth analysis. All the citations from 2,338,033 papers from the Chinese Citation Database (1979–2008) covering four disciplines—Chemistry; Clinical Medicine; Library, Information and Archival Science; and Chinese Literature and World Literature—were analyzed. Empirical results show a general weakening tendency towards citation concentration: (1) decreasing percentage of uncited published papers within a given year; (2) a higher percentage of papers required to account for the same proportion of citation than before; and (3) the steady decline in the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) of citation distribution. All three measures indicate a decline in citing concentration or an increase in citation breadth. This phenomenon may be the result of increased access to materials, perhaps because of the ease with which scholarly materials can be accessed through the Internet.

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