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Summary  

An analysis of 2058 papers published by Chinese authors and 2678 papers published by Indian authors in the field of computer science during 1971-2000 indicates that India's output is significantly higher than the Chinese output. However, China is catching up fast. Chinese researchers prefer to publish their research results in domestic journals, while Indian researchers prefer to publish their research results in journals published in the advanced countries of the West. Also the share of papers in journals covered by SCI for India was higher than from China. However, no significant difference has been observed in the impact of the research output of the two countries as seen by different impact indicators. Team research is more common in India as compared to China.

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Scientometrics
Authors: B. Gupta, Praveen Sharma, and Suresh Kumar

Abstract  

The paper deals with the nature of growth models currently used in the literature for modeling the growth of publications. It introduces briefly three growth models and explores the applicability of these models in the growth of world and Indian physics literature. The analysis suggests that the growth of Indian physics literature follows a logistic model, while the growth of world physics literature is explained by a combination of logistic and power models. The criteria for selection of growth models based on the new growth rate functions suggested by Egghe and Ravichandra Rao are given. The methodology suggested by Egghe and Ravichandra Rao is shown to work satisfactorily, except for longer time series growth data, when we may have to restore to data splitting approach, if suggested by the plots of new growth rate functions. This approach helped us to use a combination of two growth models instead of one, to explain the growth of world physics literature.

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Abstract  

The paper examines the scientific productivity of male and female scientistts working in the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), India at the overall agency level and at the group of laboratories level, characterized by three broad subjects of physical, biological, and engineering sciences. The productivity of scientists is evaluated on the basis of three parameters: the extent of scientists not publishing any paper, the average number of papers per scientist, and using Lotka's approach. In order to find out whether there is any significant difference between male and female productivity distributions, a Chi-square test is used. Studies the applicability of Lotka's inverse power law and some other statistical models in the distribution of scientific productivity of male and female scientists. Concludes that no significant difference exists between productivity distributions of male and female scientists.

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Abstract  

The study analyses the distribution of productivity of authors in theoretical population genetics (TPG) as reflected in their publication output from 1881 to 1980 from two different approaches. The internal dynamics of TPG specialty affecting the distribution of the productivity of authors is studied using time cross-sectional type of approach. Here the productivity distribution of authors in 10 time-year blocks and in three phases of the development (1921-50, 1951-65 and 1966-80) of TPG is studied using cohort type of approach. The extent of cumulative advantage acquired by the prolific group of authors over time in TPG is also studied. The paper also analyzes the regularity in the distribution of productivity of various cohorts, having same length of activity, but different periods of participation.

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Abstract  

Traces the growth of collaborated and funded research as reflected in research papers in theoretical population genetics research speciality from 1916–80 through a case study. Analyses the proportion and extent of collaborated papers, averge number of authorship per paper, and collaborative coefficient index of research papers thereby giving an overall perspective of the growth of professionalism in the field. Studies the relation between collaboration, productivity, and funding of research papers in theoretical population genetics. Classifies the total collaborative papers/authors by type of collaboration and studies the trends and shifts in the nature and type of collaborative research over the years.

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Abstract  

Recently scientists have investigated what statistical distributions can be used to describe the distribution of the number of authors per article.Ajiferuke has undertaken the most comprehensive study of this problem. He has found that by and large the Inverse Gaussian-Poisson distribution could describe most properly the observed authorship distributions. However, it is well known that this distribution is rather intricate, soRousseau tried to fit some simple one-parameter distributions to the number of authors of LIS articles. He has found that the geometric and the truncated Poisson distribution adequately describe these authorship data sets. The main purpose of the present paper is to continue these investigations and to analyse and test the viability of simple statistical distributions. As to (sub)fields where the single author dominates the results ofRousseau were corroborated: the truncated Poisson and the geometric distribution give often adequate fits to describe the number of authors. The Lotka distribution should be rejected. The truncated binomial distribution and the truncated negative binomial were investigated as well. However, it is not clear whether they are acceptable candidates.

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In the behavioral science field, many of the oldest tests have still most frequently been used almost in the same way for decades. The subjective influence of human observer and the large inter-observer and interlab differences are substantial among these tests. This necessitates the possibility of using technological innovations for behavioral science to obtain new parameters, results and insights as well. The light-dark box (LDB) test is a characteristic tool used to assess anxiety in rodents. A complete behavioral analysis (including both anxiety and locomotion parameters) is not possible by performing traditional LDB test protocol, as it lacks the usage of a real-time video recording of the test. In the current report, we describe an improved approach to conduct LDB test using a real-time video tracking system.

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Summary  

An analysis of 16891 publications published by Indian scientists during 1993-2002 and indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science) indicates that the publication output in the agricultural sciences is on the decline since 1998 onwards.  'Dairy and animal sciences' followed by 'veterinary sciences' constitute the largest component of the Indian agricultural research output. Agricultural universities and institutes under the aegis of Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) are the major producers of research output. Most of the papers have been published in domestic journals and in low normalized impact factor journals with a low rate of citation per paper. Most of the highly productive institutions are either agricultural universities or the institutes under the aegis of ICAR. Most of the prolific authors are from the highly productive institutions. However, only a few highly cited authors are from highly productive institutions. 

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Scientometrics
Authors: B.M. Gupta, Suresh Kumar, S. Sangam, and C.R. Karisiddappa

Abstract  

The main objectives of this study are: (a) to find the applicability of selected growth models to the growth of publications in six sub-disciplines of social sciences, namely anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology, and sociology in the world; and (b) to verify the criteria for selecting the most appropriate growth model suggested by Eggheand Rao (1992).

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Scientometrics
Authors: Ashok Jain, K. Garg, Praveen Sharma, and Suresh Kumar

Abstract  

The paper assesses impact of Science and Engineering Research Council (SERC) funding in chemical sciences during 1976–1989 using scientometric techniques. Other indicators like awards won, fellowship to prestigious academies, membership to editorial boards received by the project investigators, Ph.D. degrees awarded, collaborations established and new courses introduced due to SERC funding have also been analyzed. The study indicates that activity index of research out put in various frontier areas of chemical sciences have gone up despite a decrease in Indian activity index in these areas. The growth pattern of papers for “Organometallic and Organometalloidal Compounds” are similar for India and world. Contribution of SERC's project investigators in high impact factor (≥2) journals and the citations received by the papers published by them are higher than Indian contributions in chemical sciences. The SERC funding has resulted in a three fold increase in the number of Ph.D. degrees awarded in chemical sciences and SERC project investigators have won many prestigious awards, fellowship to academies and membership of the editorial board of the journals. The SERC funded research has also resulted in new courses at various universities.

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