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  • Author or Editor: Szu-chia Lo x
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Abstract  

In this study, the author tried to demonstrate the linkage between science research and technology development through non-patent citation analysis to reveal that the important knowledge resources from science research had significant impact on technology development. Genetic engineering technology was the field examined in this study. From the references listed in the patents, it was observed that the technology development in genetic engineering was influenced heavily by the research done by public sector. Over 90% of the citations were non-patent literatures, and the majority of non-patent citations were journal articles. Citing preferences, such as country preference and institute preference were observed from the data included in this study.

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Abstract  

The aim of this study is to reveal the research growth, the distribution of research productivity and impact of genetic engineering research in Japan, Korea and Taiwan by taking patent bibliometrics approach. This study uses quantitative methods adopt from bibliometrics to analyze the patents granted to Japan, Korea and Taiwan by United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) from 1991 to 2002. In addition to patent and citation count, Bradford’s Law is applied to identify core assignees in genetic engineering. Patent coupling approach is taken to further analyze the patents granted to the core assignees to enclose the correlations among the core assignees. 13,055 genetic engineering patents were granted during the period of 1991 to 2002. Japan, Korea and Taiwan own 841 patents and Japan owns most of them. 270 assignees shared 841 patents and 16 core assignees are identified by the Bradford’s Law. 18,490 patents were cited by the 13,055 patents and 1,146 out of the 18,490 cited patents were granted to Japan, Korea and Taiwan. The results show Japan performs best in productivity and research impact among three countries. The core assignees are also Japan based institutions and four technical clusters are identified by patent coupling.

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Abstract  

The aim of this study is to reveal the possible linkage among the 40 primary organizations in Genetic Engineering Research by taking the Patent Coupling approach. The primary organizations were defined by the productivity and identified by the patent count and Bradford Law. The author analyzed the cited patents of the patents granted by United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) from 1991 to 2002 to the 40 primary organizations (assignees) in Genetics Engineering Research to establish the correlation. 780 coupling pairs formed by the 40 primary organizations and Coupling Index and Coupling Strength were calculated for each pair and primary organization. Correlation Analysis and Multiple-Dimension Scaling were applied further based on Coupling Index. Technological clusters were found in the results of the analyses.

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