Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: T. Joel Wade x
Clear All Modify Search

Evolutionary theory based research shows that women and men may differ in their responses to sexual and emotional infidelity. The present research sought to determine how the mate value characteristics of rivals affect the levels of emotional reaction men and women experience with these types of infidelity. Women were expected to report higher levels of upset when their male partners committed infidelity with an attractive rather than an unattractive woman while men were expected to experience the most upset when their female partners committed sexual infidelity with a male rival regardless of the rival's financial status. The results were partially consistent with these hypotheses. Women were most upset by their partner's sexual infidelity regardless of the attractiveness of their female rival and more upset by their partner's emotional infidelity with an attractive woman. Men were most upset with their partner's commission of sexual infidelity regardless of the financial status of their male rival. These findings are discussed in terms of prior research examining sex differences in jealousy and intrasexual competition.

Restricted access

To determine whether infant facial attractiveness is related to perceived adoptability, participants were asked to rate photographs of Asian, Black, and White babies on perceived: adoptability, attractiveness, intelligence, health, proportional eye size, and facial shape. It was hypothesized that (a) Asian babies would be rated highest in adoptability, attractiveness, intelligence, health, and facial shape, (b) that attractiveness would be the strongest predictor of adoptability, (c) and that babies perceived as having the largest eyes would also be rated as most attractive, and most adoptable. The results obtained were partially consistent with the first hypothesis and entirely consistent with second and third hypotheses. These findings are discussed in terms of prior research on facial attractiveness,and adoptability.

Restricted access
Authors: T. Joel Wade, Ryan Palmer, Mike DiMaria, Courtnay Johnson and Megan Multack

Abstract

Evolutionary theory based research has examined how sexual access and emotional access affect mate selection. However, evolutionary theory based research has not examined how deficits in sexual access and emotional access affect relationship termination decisions. The present research sought to fill this void with two studies examining the questions of whether or not: a lack of sexual access is more likely to lead men to end a relationship, and whether or not a lack of emotional access is more likely to lead women to end a relationship. Based on prior research investigating divorce, sexual infidelity, and male and female mate selection preferences, men were expected to be more likely to end a relationship due to a lack of sexual access while women were expected to be more likely to end a relationship due to a lack of emotional access. The results were consistent with the hypothesis for women. Both men and women were more likely to terminate their relationships due to lack of emotional access. These results are discussed in terms of parental investment concerns, commitment loss, and prior research.

Restricted access