Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Theodoros Ntaflos x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

The alkaline basalt of the Füzes-tó scoria cone is the youngest volcanic product of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field. The bombs and massive lava fragments are rich in various crystals, such as mantle-derived xenocrysts (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, spinel), high-pressure mineral phases (clinopyroxene) and phenocrysts (olivine, clinopyroxene). Peridotite xenoliths are also common. Ratios of incompatible trace elements (Zr/Nb and Nb/Y) suggest that the primary magma was formed in the transitional spinel-garnet stability field, at the uppermost part of the asthenosphere. Magmatic spinel inclusions with low-Cr# (22–35) in olivine phenocrysts can reflect a fertile peridotite source. The olivine, orthopyroxene, colourless clinopyroxene and spinel xenocrysts are derived from different depths of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle and their compositions resemble the mineral phases of the ultramafic xenoliths found in this region. The rarer green clinopyroxene cores of clinopyroxene phenocrysts could represent high-pressure products of crystallization from a more evolved melt than the host magma, or they could be derived from mafic lower crustal rocks. Crystallization of the basaltic magma resulted in olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Their compositions reflect polybaric crystallization with a final, strongly oxidized stage. The Füzes-tó basalt does not represent a certain magma composition, but a mixture of mineral phases having various origin and mantle-derived basaltic melt.

Restricted access

Abstract

The 13.5 Ma Harsány ignimbrite, in the eastern part of the Bükkalja volcanic field, eastern-central Europe, provides a rare example of mingled rhyolite. It consists of two distinct pumice populations (‘A’- and ‘B’-type) that can be recognized only by detailed geochemical work. The pumice and the host ignimbrite have a similar mineral assemblage involving quartz, plagioclase, biotite and sporadic Kfeldspar. Zircon, allanite, apatite and ilmenite occur as accessory minerals. The distinct pumice types are recognized by their different trace element compositions and the different CaO contents of their groundmass glasses. Plagioclase has an overlapping composition; however, biotite shows bimodal composition. Based on trace element and major element modeling, a derivation of ‘A’-type rhyolite magma from the ‘B’-type magma by fractional crystallization is excluded. Thus, the two pumice types represent two isolated rhyolite magma batches, possibly residing in the same crystal mush. Coeval remobilization of the felsic magmas might be initiated by intrusion of hot basaltic magma into the silicic magma reservoir The rapid ascent of the foaming rhyolite magmas enabled only a short-lived interaction and thus, a syn-eruptive mingling between the two magma batches.

Restricted access