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  • Author or Editor: Thomas Gärtner x
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The present article examines the exact relationship between the prose of Solinus and the medieval versifications by Theodericus and the author of De monstris Indie (Jakobi has shown De monstris Indie as beingdependent on Theodericus). A close analysis of the different rhyming and elision techniques adopted by Theodericus and the redactor of De monstris Indie helps to emend some passages. The redactor of De monstris Indie is demonstrated not only as having abbreviated the text of Theodericus in many cases, but also as having inserted an interpolation in one instance. Furthermore, the transmitted text of Theodericus itself seems to have undergone some redactional changes. Finally, it is shown that the significance of allusions to classical Latin writers must not be underrated, even in obviously mediocre medieval Latin versifications such as the specimen under examination here.

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This paper tries to develop the characteristics of Roman love elegy from the scanty remains of Greek Hellenistic elegy. The most important Hellenistic predecessors of love elegy are poems mourning a deceased partner, like the Lyde of Antimachos of Kolophon and the Epikedeion Aretes of Parthenios of Nikaia. These poems seem to have contained at least some subjective passages, even if they are difficult to verify in the fragmentary tradition. The novelty of Roman love elegy seems to consist not only in the intensivation of such subjective elements, but mainly in a change of direction of the mourning element still present there: the love elegist mourns not a beloved partner's external death, but his own death-like desolation because of the partner's infidelity. The motive of mourning death used literally in Hellenistic Elegy is metaphorized in Roman love elegy.

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In the present paper a number of difficult passages in the poems of Catullus are discussed: carm. 1.9; 2.8; 4.23; 6.12/17; 10.9; 32.9–11; 36.9; 38.7s; 44.19/21; 54; 55. 13–22; 58b; 64. 219; 65. 5/8; 6.28/74; 67.1; 68.85; 80.8; 84.5; 100.6; 107.3; 110.7; 111.2; 113.7s.

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The present paper examines the crucial passages in Lucanus, Valerius Flaccus, Statius and Sily concerning suicide. Lucanus presents a fanatical eulogy of suicide, Valerius Flaccus a rather calculated approach which is guided by almost philosophical considerations resembling those given by the philosopher Seneca, Statius focuses on the problem of self determination and tyranny. Sily’s account of the Saguntine suicide combines and modifies different elements of the literary tradition, which sometimes makes it difficult to ascertain the value judgement his narrative is meant to convey to his readers.

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A new conjectural solution concerning the textual problem in Luc. Phars. IV 578 is proposed.

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A number of difficult passages of [Verg.] Culex are discussed. In some cases lacunae seem more helpful than textual changes, and in general the author’s very careful use of elisions should be observed. Finally an experimental edition of [Verg.] Culex is tried, starting from the variants given in the OCT edition.

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The present article examines the concept of a malicious fatum as evolved by the narrator of Lucan's Bellum civile and especially the subjective attitudes adopted by the protagonists Caesar, Pompey and Cato towards this destructive force. Since Lucan's fatum is not benevolent but malicious and hence contrary to the Stoic doctrine, the ethical value of the protagonists is not measured by their readiness to follow fate (as Stoics would have done), but by the degree of their intellectual resistance to fate: Caesar follows fate unhesitatingly; Pompey sometimes seems to believe, mistakenly, in its benevolence, but in crucial and decisive situations he recognizes its malignity; Cato is the only one who, from the very beginning, internalizes the intrinsic moral corruption of fate. The last section in this article deals with a totally different concept of fate, which is recognizeable in some passages of the tenth book of Bellum civile.

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Close examination of the arithmetic structure of book composition in Greek novels reveals in various degrees a constant pattern of dichotomy: In the first part of the novels the heroes stray about looking for each other while in the second part they meet for a stationary final scene at the court of a married couple of potentates, involving some kind of judgement. Furthermore, in the second section of the paper the individual technique of book closure adopted by different novelists is analyzed.

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