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  • Author or Editor: Ulrich Luft x
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The concept of right and left has changed during the long Egyptian history. At its beginning the left side is the less honouring one. Evidence can be shown in the statuary of the Old Kingdom, but without consequence. The tradition of the Old Testament diplays the honouring right side in opposition to the dishonouring left side. The New Testament clearly distincts between right and left as honouring and disgracing side. Gnostic thinkers develloped this concept with the consequence that the realm of Good includes the mid too. Hence the left rested alone as the realm of Evil without hope to escape the dead substance. There are, however, relicts of the former Egyptian concept that did consider the sides in a less extreme point of view. The pagan treatises of the Nag Hammadi library and of the Corpus hermeticus seem to maintain original Egyptian views opposite to treatises influenced by Christianity. The demiurge being the logos became a neutral divinity in these treatises, otherwhise the demiurge belongs to the bad sphere. The gnosis put the man in the centre of the reflection, hence he gaines the first place before all powers of the good side who stayed there since the beginning, or who reached the good region after a throughout penitence. The gnostic man reached it by revelation of the divine.

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Dating rockdrawings is a subtle task. The drawings of elephants found at Bi'ir Minih should be inserted in the timing of rockdrawings which extend from the Neolithic age to the Christian era. There is evidence for the early Neolithic date.

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The Hermetic dialogue Asclepius occupies a central place in the Corpus Hermeticum. One part of Asclepius and the prayer at its end was translated into Coptic from Greek. This paper examines the richness of Egyptian thought incorporated into the dialogue and demonstrates the close relations between the work and Hellenistic Egyptian religion.

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