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Ground based observations of the “Széchenyi István” Geophysical Observatory of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Nagycenk) offer a unique opportunity for investigation of the complex processes of Earth’s environment and of its effect on radio wave propagation. High temporal resolution recording of variations of the geomagnetic field, vertical incidence sounding of the ionosphere and observation of whistlers enable determination of plasma density profiles in the inner magnetosphere (plasmasphere) and their changes. Study of ionospheric processes and their effects in the upper atmosphere (thermosphere) is supported by a permanent GPS station. Both DC and AC fields of lightning discharges are also recorded in the Observatory. Measurement of the DC field is related to the atmospheric electric circuit, where the global thunderstorm activity is the generator and fine weather areas play the role of loading. Loading of the atmospheric electric field depends on rate of ionization, ionization being caused by galactic cosmic rays. However, galactic cosmic rays are modulated by solar activity. Similarly amplitude of Schumann resonances depend on thunderstorm activity and its distance from the recording site. Resonance frequencies occurring at wave-lengths approximating dimensions of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide are affected by conductivity variations of the upper boundary of the cavity resonator and thus, by changes of thickness of the cavity resonator.

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In connection with the EURISGIC WP2 project the authors present those procedures which have been used to construct a map in cells on the electrical resistivity distribution in Europe at least till to the asthenosphere. The data are based on the deep magnetotelluric soundings published in the international literature. This map is the basis of the calculation of the induction risk endangering the electric network and communication systems.

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Firstly the authors give an overview on the geological, geophysical and tectonical features of the Diósjenő  dislocation belt (or zone, according to some authors) around the river Ipoly near the Hungarian-Slovak border among great structural units: Vepor, Gemericum and formations of the Mid Hungarian Mts. The longest magnetic anomaly of the Pannonian Basin lies in this belt. It is assumed that it is due to ultrabasic magmatite of greenschist facies. The near-surface geoelectric soundings did not find any conductivity increase near Diósjenő  (western part of the zone), but there are graphitic micaschists in the boreholes around Szécsény. There is some earthquake activitiy in the region with hypothetical depth of 7-8 km. Two deep magnetotelluric (MT) profiles cross the dislocation zone. The resistivity distribution from the surface to the conductive asthenosphere along these profiles was obtained by using instruments, operating in two different period ranges. After processing the measured data by 1D/2D inversion, it became obvious that the dislocation zone includes electrically conducting roots at a depth of 7-11 km. This result hints at the presence of fluid in the broken rocks having increased porosity in the dislocation zone. Another component that can increase the conductivity could be the graphite (carbon) originating from the Paleozoic crystalline rocks of the Gemericum (or Vepor). The ductile phase (fluid/graphite) observed by high conductivity in the centre of the dislocation zone can play an important role in the generation of the earthquakes according to the most recent statements of the international literature.

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Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica
Authors: A. Ádám, P. Bencze, F. Märcz, D. Martini, G. Sátori, L. Szarka, J. Verő, V. Wesztergom, and B. Zieger

This is a summary of the activities of the Geophysics Department of the Geodetic and Geophysical Institute in the framework of the Scientific School Earth Electromagnetism. Ten reports cover the most important topics and emphasize interconnections between the different phenomena. The topics include interplanetary space, magnetosphere and ionosphere, electromagnetic waves in a wide spectrum, and electromagnetic induction, also within a wide range of frequencies and applications. Geomagnetism, especially the Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory Nagycenk with a lot of different recordings of electromagnetic parameters play important roles in most topics.

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Acta Geodaetica et Geophysica Hungarica
Authors: A. Ádám, P. Bencze, J. Bór, B. Heilig, Á. Kis, A. Koppán, K. Kovács, I. Lemperger, F. Märcz, D. Martini, A. Novák, G. Sátori, S. Szalai, L. Szarka, J. Verő, V. Wesztergom, and B. Zieger

The paper describes research in geomagnetism and aeronomy carried out in the framework of a project organized by the Geodetic and Geophysical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. It includes the development of the instrumentation of the Nagycenk Geophysical Observatory (geomagnetic measuring systems, ionosonde), moreover other instrumental and methodological developments, too. Observatory data are available in a database. Based on results of the Nagycenk and Tihany observatories and on data of permanent and temporal networks, long-term trends of different electromagnetic parameters were investigated. Thus geomagnetic activity was found secularly increasing, a decrease of the atmospheric electric potential gradient and a 11-year modulation of the winter/December attenuation of the geomagnetic pulsation activity were confirmed. Several possibilities (pulsations, whistlers, modelling) were used to improve knowledge about structure and parameters of the magnetosphere. Electromagnetic precursors of earthquakes were looked for. A significant increase of understanding was obtained in connection with Schumann resonances and electromagnetic transients caused by lightning. It was shown that see-coasts influence characteristically changes in ionospheric trends ( h m F2). When looking for the effect of the global climate changes in the subsurface electric resistivity, an example was discovered for the decrease of the resistivity due to infiltrating water from precipitation. Electromagnetic exploration of tectonically conditioned weak zones was continued, too.

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