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  • Author or Editor: Viktor Stéger x
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Recently, there has been considerable interest in genetic differentiation in the Cervidae family. A common tool used to determine genetic variation in different species, breeds and populations is mitochondrial DNA analysis, which can be used to estimate phylogenetic relationships among animal taxa and for molecular phylogenetic evolution analysis. With the development of sequencing technology, more and more mitochondrial sequences have been made available in public databases, including whole mitochondrial DNA sequences. These data have been used for phylogenetic analysis of animal species, and for studies of evolutionary processes.

We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of a Central European red deer, Cervus elaphus hippelaphus, from Hungary by a next generation sequencing technology. The mitochondrial genome is 16 354 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region, all of which are arranged similar as in other vertebrates. We made phylogenetic analyses with the new sequence and 76 available mitochondrial sequences of Cervidae, using Bos taurus mitochondrial sequence as outgroup. We used ‘neighbor joining’ and ‘maximum likelihood’ methods on whole mitochondrial genome sequences; the consensus phylogenetic trees supported monophyly of the family Cervidae; it was divided into two subfamilies, Cervinae and Capreolinae, and five tribes, Cervini, Muntiacini, Alceini, Odocoileini, and Capreolini. The evolutionary structure of the family Cervidae can be reconstructed by phylogenetic analysis based on whole mitochondrial genomes; which method could be used broadly in phylogenetic evolutionary analysis of animal taxa.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Renáta Fábián, András Kovács, Viktor Stéger, Krisztián Frank, István Egerszegi, János Oláh and Szilárd Bodó

The Polled Intersex Syndrome (PIS) is responsible for the absence of horns in homozygous and heterozygous goats causing a female-to-male sex reversal in the homozygous polled genotypic female (XX) goats. A simple and efficient non-invasive method was elaborated to detect the genotypic sex from hair and faecal samples using a pair of primers to amplify the X- and Y-linked alleles of the amelogenin gene. The PCR products were easily distinguishable using agarose gel electrophoresis: we detected an X-specific single band in samples originating from healthy phenotypic females and double (X- and Y-) bands in samples from males. The new PCR method is applicable for diagnosing the sex of PIS-affected animals already as newborn kids, in contrast with the phenotypic findings appearing only after puberty, and thus it may replace the cumbersome chromosome investigations.

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