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To investigate the effect of Zn fertilization on soil Zn fractions and grain Zn concentration in wheat grown on potentially Zn-deficient soil, a field experiment was carried out. The experimental design was split plot consisted of two varieties of wheat (Zhengmai 9023 and Xinong 889) with five Zn levels (0, 7.5, 15, 30 and 45 kg Zn/ha). Results showed that Zn fertilization had no significant effect on wheat yield and grain Zn concentration, and the recovery of Zn fertilizer was only 0.06% to 0.29%. However, the amount of soil DTPA-Zn was increased by 2.3-9.8-folds as Zn supplementation increases during the whole wheat growth stage as compared to the control (Zn0 treatment). Besides, DTPA-Zn was positively correlated with both Loose organic matter bound Zn (LOM-Zn) and Exchange Zn (Ex-Zn), and their partial correlation coefficients were 0.558 and 0.119, respectively. Moreover, these two fractions also showed positive correlation with grain Zn concentration. The amount of LOM-Zn was firstly increased with increasing Zn fertilizer levels then gradually decreased as it get converted to mineral bound Zn (Min-Zn). Zn fertilization in this potentially Zn deficient soil increased the amount of DTPA-Zn in the whole wheat growth stage; however, grain Zn concentration cannot be significantly increased as Zn levels increase, thus suggesting that there are inhibitory factors for Zn absorption and translocation. Furthermore, the amount of soil DTPA-Zn perhaps cannot exactly reflect the capability of soil to supply Zn.

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Hydroponic studies were conducted to investigate the role of iron plaque on transport and distribution of chromium (Cr) by rice seedlings. Microscopical observations indicate that iron plaque developed quickly at the root surface of rice seedlings, but the distribution of iron plaque was more intense near root base and less towards root tip. Results showed that rice seedlings exposed to Cr(III) depicted significantly higher capacity for Cr accumulation in plant tissues than Cr(VI) in the presence of iron plaque. However, transport of Cr within plant cells was more evident in Cr(VI) treatment with iron plaque than Cr(III) treatment. Results also showed that there are significant impact on transport of K, Mn and Zn in rice seedlings treated with Cr(VI) in the presence of iron plaque, while significant effect on transport of Mn and Zn were observed in Cr(III)-treated rice seedlings. Results from detached root test provide additional evidence to confirm the presence of iron plaque, that had different impact on Cr uptake when Cr(VI) or Cr(III) was supplied.

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Three field experiments were conducted to determine the effect of soil Zn, foliar Zn, and soil N application on Zn and phytic acid concentrations in wheat grain grown on potentially Zn-deficient soil. Results showed significant genotypic variation in grain Zn concentrations among fifteen wheat cultivars commonly grown in northwest China. Soil Zn application had mixed effects, increasing grain Zn concentrations of some cultivars by as much as 21%, but reducing grain Zn concentrations of other cultivars by as much as 14%. In comparison, foliar Zn application increased grain Zn concentrations by 26 to 115%. Grain Zn concentrations were 14% larger in the combined (foliar Zn + soil Zn) treatment compared to the foliar Zn treatment, but the added cost of soil Zn application may not be economically justifiable. Wheat grain phytic acid concentrations and phytic acid: Zn molar ratios were less in the foliar Zn and (foliar Zn + soil Zn) treatments compared to the soil Zn and the unfertilized treatments. This indicated that foliar Zn increased Zn bioavailability. Best results were obtained when foliar Zn was applied at early grain filling. Overall, these findings indicate that foliar Zn application to Zn-efficient cultivars could reduce human Zn deficiency in regions with potentially Zn-deficient soil.

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Abstract  

The effect of excipients on the secondary structure of lyophilized proteins was studied through second-derivative Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis. The glass transition temperature (T g), denaturation temperature (T d) and moisture content were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). T g, T d and the preservation of protein secondary structure were found to be dependent upon the type and amount of the excipient included in the formulation. Meanwhile, the lyophilized proteins easily adsorbed amounts of moisture during storage to reduce their T gs and stability.

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Cyanocobalamin (CNCbl), a kind of vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl), which has a special binding capability to rapid dividing cells and proliferating tissue, especially tumors, has been modified and labeled by 99mTc. The optimal labeling condition was determined, and the biodistribution of 99mTc-DTPA-b-CNCbl both in normal mice and TA2 mice bearing MA891 mammary tumors were studied. 99mTc-DTPA-b-CNCbl showed low uptake and rapid clearance in nontarget tissues, and renal excretion. About 40% of uptake at 1 hour remained in the tumor at 12 hours p.i. The satisfying ratio of T/NT was acquired at 6 hours p.i.

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Abstract  

Polyacrylamide (PAM), poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) and poly(N,N-diethylacryl-amide) (PDEA) were synthesized by plasma-initiated polymerization. Both wet and dry polymers were prepared. The states of the water absorbed in the wet and dry samples were studied directly by means of TG, and the stabilities of the dry polymers in the process of thermal treatment were investigated by FT-IR. The activation energy of release of the bonded water was calculated by the Kissinger method. The water absorbed in the polymers was found to be in two states, i.e. weakly-bonded water and bonded water, and the absorbed water content varied with the monomer concentration, the plasma duration time and the type of polymer.

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Five giant embryo mutants, described as MH-gel, MH-ge2, MH-ge3, MH-ge4 and MH-ge5 , which were derived from the same indica rice cv . ‘Minghui 86’ and characterized by 2.0, 1.88, 2.08, 1.93 and 1.88 times enlarged embryo than that of wild type, were selected for the current study. The mutated giant embryos were controlled by a single recessive gene, and except mutated locus with MH-ge1 other four loci were allelic to each other and the previous reported locus ge in japonica rice cv . ‘Kinmaze’. No obvious differences in physicochemical properties such as apparent amylose content (AAC), alkali spreading value (ASV), gel consistency (GC), and starch paste viscosity were observed between giant embryo mutants and wild type. Significant increases in the contents of crude lipid (LC), crude protein (PC), Vitamin B1 (V B1 ), Vitamin B2 (V B2 ), Vitamin E (V E ), essential amino acids such as Arginine (Arg), Aspartic acid (Asp), Glutamic acid (Glu), Lysine (Lys), Methionine (Met), and mineral elements such as calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and zinc (Zn) were detected in brown rice (BR) of giant embryo mutants. The amounts of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, were similar in the BR of giant embryo mutants and wild type, and more GABA content was observed in germinated brown rice (GBR) than BR. Significant enrichments were detected in the GBR of giant embryo mutants, basically corresponding to the enlarged embryo.

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Abstract  

Chemical elemental compositions of some silicate, magnetic and glass spherules were investigated with INAA. The elements determined include Os, Ir, Ni, Co, Fe, Cr, Au, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Yb, Lu and Sc etc. The elemental correlation, as well as their enrichment (or depletion) factors relative to Cl chondrite were examined. The high concentrations of the refractory siderophile elements contained in these spherules support the proposal that they originate from extraterrestrial substances. Some useful chemical criteria for identifying the sources of silicate, magnetic and glass spherules are put forward.

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Abstract  

In order to measure 182Hf by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a chemical procedure for separation of hafnium from tungsten has been developed by extraction chromatography. The extraction chromatographic behavior of hafnium and tungsten has been studied using tri-n-octylamine (TOA) as the stationary phase, HCl–H2O2 mixture and NH3·H2O as the mobile phase. The effects of H2O2 concentration, column loading and column dimensions are investigated. Hf and W with microgram amounts are successfully separated on a chromatographic column (Ø5 × 196 mm), on which Hf is hardly retained after completely eluted with 6 M HCl–1% H2O2 and W strongly adsorbed is then eluted with 3 M NH3·H2O. The decontamination factor for tungsten is 3.0 × 105 and the recovery of hafnium is better than 99% using a single column separation.

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