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Abstract

This paper investigates whether CiteULike and Mendeley are useful for measuring scholarly influence, using a sample of 1,613 papers published in Nature and Science in 2007. Traditional citation counts from the Web of Science (WoS) were used as benchmarks to compare with the number of users who bookmarked the articles in one of the two free online reference manager sites. Statistically significant correlations were found between the user counts and the corresponding WoS citation counts, suggesting that this type of influence is related in some way to traditional citation-based scholarly impact but the number of users of these systems seems to be still too small for them to challenge traditional citation indexes.

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Abstract  

Previous research has shown that Web link based metrics can correlate with traditional research assessment at the university level. In this study, we test whether the same is true for the computer science departments in the UK. The relevant Web Impact Factors (WIFs) were calculated from the link data collected both from AltaVista and the special academic crawler of the University of Wolverhampton. The numbers of staff members and Web pages in each computer science department were used as denominators for the WIFs calculation. The number of inlinks to the computer science departments correlated significantly with their research productivities, and WIFs with numbers of staff members as denominators correlated significantly with their Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) ratings. The number of staff members was confirmed to be a better indicator of departmental size than the number of Web pages within the department's domain.

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Abstract  

The sorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution on MX-80 bentonite was studied as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, solid contents, humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA) and temperature under ambient conditions using batch technique. The results indicate that sorption of U(VI) on MX-80 bentonite is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. The removal of U(VI) to MX-80 bentonite is rather quick and the kinetic sorption data is simulated well by a pseudo-second-order rate equation. The presence of HA enhances the sorption of U(VI) on MX-80 bentonite obviously, but the influence of FA on U(VI) sorption is not obvious. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0, ΔS 0, and ΔG 0) for the sorption of U(VI) calculated from temperature dependent sorption suggest that the sorption reaction is endothermic and spontaneous.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Xuemei Li, Mike Thelwall, David Wilkinson, and Peter Musgrove

Summary  

Although many link patterns have been identified at the university level, departmental interlinking has been relatively ignored. Universities are multidisciplinary by nature and various disciplines may employ the Web differently, thus patterns identified at the university level may hide subject differences. Departments are typically subject-oriented, and departmental interlinking may therefore illustrate interesting disciplinary linking patterns, perhaps relating to informal scholarly communication. The aim of this paper is to identify whether and how link patterns differ along country and disciplinary lines between similar disciplines and similar countries. Physics, Chemistry and Biology departments in Australia, Canada and the UK have been chosen. In order to get a holistic picture of departments' Web use profiles and link patterns, five different perspectives are identified and compared for each set of departments. Differences in link patterns are identified along both national and disciplinary lines, and are found to reflect offline phenomena. Along national lines, a likely explanation for the difference is that countries with better research performances make more general use of the Web; and, with respect to international peer interlinking, countries that share more scholarly communication tend to interlink more with each other. Along disciplinary lines, it seems that departments from disciplines which are more willing to distribute their research outputs tend to make more general use of the Web, and also interlink more with their national and international peers.

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National and international university departmental Web site interlinking

Part 1: Validation of departmental link analysis

Scientometrics
Authors: Xuemei Li, Mike Thelwall, David Wilkinson, and Peter Musgrove

Summary  

The structural similarity between hyperlinks and citations has encouraged information scientists to apply bibliometric techniques to the Web. University links have been previously validated as a new data source through significant statistical correlations between link and research measures, together with identification of motivations for hyperlink creation at the university level. Many investigations have been conducted for university interlinking, but few for departments. University Web sites are large compared with departmental Web sites, and significant statistical results are more easily obtained. Nevertheless, universities are multidisciplinary by nature and disciplines may employ the Web differently, thus patterns identified at the university level may hide subject differences. This paper validates departmental interlinking, using Physics, Chemistry and Biology departments from Australia, Canada and the UK.

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Abstract  

The mechanism of solvent extraction of gold(III) in hydrochloric acid media with quaternary ammonium salt octadecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride dissolved in chloroform was studied. The influences of temperature, NaCl and HCl concentraction on the extraction equilibrium were also investigated. The extraction reaction is exothermic ( H° = -28.53±0.15 kJ/mol) and log K ex = 5.47±0.04.

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Abstract  

Interfacial tension and interfacial adsorption parameters for benzyloctadecyldimethyl ammonium chloride (BODMAC) in three organic diluents were determined and interpreted. The interfacial activity of BODMAC is affected by the type of the organic diluent and the composition of the aqueous phase. The general order of interfacial activity of BODMAC is n-heptane (5% isobutanol) > carbon tetrachloride > chloroform. The effectiveness of adsorption of BODMAC is not only dependent on the organic diluent, but also on the inorganic electrolytes in the aqueous phase.

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