Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Y. Kanayama x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract  

Radioactive multitracer technique was applied to study the screening of in vivo interrelations between radioactive tracers (46Sc, 59Fe, 58Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 83Rb, 85Sr and 88Zr) and stable Mn species. Comparative uptake rates were examined in the blood, 9 organs (thymus, lung, cardiac muscle, spleen, pancreas, kidney, liver, testes and bone) and 8 brain regions (cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons and medulla, olfactory bulb) using the 3-weeks-old mice fed the Mn-deficient, -adequate or -excessive diets with Mn concentration from 0.4 to 300.4 ppm. Significant diet-related differences were found for 65Zn uptake in some organs. The dietary Mn-deficient state induced increase Zn absorption in thymus and lung in short-time span (during 48 hours after injection). On the other hand, no significant diet-related differences were observed in any brain regional uptake rates except for 54Mn uptake rate. The screening results are expected to give us new findings concerning the diet-related element-element interrelations in living bodies.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Radioactive multitracer technique was applied to study the screening of in vivo interrelations between radioactive tracers (46Sc, 54Mn, 58Co, 65Zn, 75Se, 83Rb, 85Sr and 88Zr) and stable Zn species. Comparative uptake rates were examined in the blood, nine organs (thymus, lung, cardiac muscle, spleen, pancreas, kidney, liver, testes and bone) and eight brain regions (cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons and medulla, olfactory bulb) using 3-week-old mice fed by four kinds of Zn-deficient, -adequate and -excessive diets with Zn content from 0.7 to 3520 ppm. As a result, no significant difference between the dietary Zn-deficient state (Zn content: 3.6 ppm) and Zn-adequate state (Zn content: 36 ppm) was observed in the uptake rates of 65Zn and other 46Sc, 54Mn, 58Co and 75Se, except for 83Rb. In addition, significant differences among the organ and brain regional uptakes of 46Sc, 54Mn, 58Co, 75Se and 83Rb were found in the dietary Zn-excessive state (Zn content: 3520 ppm). These results indicate that the organ and brain regional uptakes of tracers in Zn-deficient and excessive mice are strongly correlated with the blood uptakes and retentions of the tracers. Furthermore, the multitracer screening gives us new findings concerning the diet-related element-element interrelations in living bodies.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis was to study the regional distributions of the minor (Na, K) and trace (Sc, Cr, Mn, Co, Zn, Se) elements in mice bred under the controlled diets with Zn content from 0.7 to 3520 ppm in small amounts of brain regions (cerebral cortex, corpus striatum, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons and medulla, olfactory bulb). The trace elements were distributed heterogeneously among all brain regions and concentrated in corpus striatum and hippocampus. No significant changes were observed in Zn concentration of most brain regions among the mice bred under Zn-deficient ([Zn] = 3.6 ppm), -adequate and -excessive diets. The results indicate that the homeostasis of Zn seems to be maintained and the brain regional concentrations of Zn seem to be generally constant in all brain regions over a wide range of dietary Zn content from a deficient content as few ppm up to apparently excessive content as 3520 ppm. In an extremely severe Zn-deficient diet ([Zn]<0.7 ppm) where mice can hardly survive, the brain regions may have higher Zn concentration.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to the determination of manganese and potassium in the fetal and suckling organ samples (parietal bone, brain, cardiac muscle, lung, thymus, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney) and of Mn, K, Na and Cl in the developmental organ (parietal bone, brain, spinal cord, liver) and blood samples from neonatal 2- to 43-days old mice. Significant variations of the elemental concentration patterns were assessed in terms of their tissue specificity and developmental changes due to birth and growth. By comparison of fetal with suckling mice, the concentration variations showed similar patterns among most organs. In the developmental and growing process, however, significant changes of the concentration of Mn and K were observed. Mn concentrations increased with growth in brain and liver, but were constant in spinal cord and parietal bone. K concentrations showed a slight decrease in soft tissues with growth. Similar way, the variation of Na concentration was also close to that of Cl.

Restricted access