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  • Author or Editor: Y. Muramatsu x
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Abstract  

Two simple methods, (1) isotope exchange method and (2) anion exchanger column method, are developed for the determination of chemical forms of radioiodine (iodide and iodate) in water samples. Using these methods, transformations of chemical forms of iodine in various water samples were studied. It was observed that iodate in rain water (unfiltered) and milk tended to change iodide form, whereas iodide was converted to iodate form in seawater and tap water. After the Chernobyl accident both chemical forms of131I (iodide and iodate) were found in rain water samples collected in Japan.

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Abstract  

In order to assess the levels and behavior of129I (half-life: 1.6×107 y) and127I (stable) in the environment, we have developed analytical procedures involving neutron activation analysis (NAA). Environmental samples collected around Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, have been analyzed using this method. Ranges of129I and127I concentrations in surface soil were 0.9–180 mBq kg–1 and 1–60 mg kg–1, respectively. Higher129I concentrations were found in soil samples collected from coniferous forests, suggesting a contribution from tree canopies in the deposition of this nuclide. Most of the129I in soil, was found to be retained in the first 10 cm. The129I/127I ratios in wheat fields were lower than those in rice paddy fields.A soil sample collected by IAEA from an area contaminated by the Chemobyl accident was also determined. The129I concentration and the129I/127I ratio were 1.6 mBq kg–1 and 1.7×10–7, respectively. The129I level in this sample was higher than the values obtained in areas far from nuclear facilities in Japan. It was suggested that the analysis of129I in soils in the Chernobyl area may be useful in evaluating the131I levels at the time of the accident.Analyses of129I and127I by ICP-MS in water samples were also made. The analytical speed of this method was very high, i.e., 3 minutes for a sample. However, there is a sensitivity limitation for129I detection due to interference from129Xe with the129I peak. The detection limits for129I and127I in water samples were about 0.5 mBq ml–1 and 0.1 ng ml–1, respectively.

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Abstract  

A simple pre-irradiation procedure for the separation of iodine from soil has been developed. A soil sample was heated in a quartz tube for 15 min at about 900 °C. The evaporated iodine was collected in activated charcoal, which was produced from phenol resin with low impurities. The charcoal, with sorbed iodine, was irradiated by neutrons and the128I produced was measured. A successful elimination of the background radioactivity due to the matrix elements was possible with this separation procedure. The detection limit by this method for soil samples was about 0.1 mg/kg (dry). The method has been applied to analyze selected soil samples.

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Abstract  

In order to assess the behavior of Tc in flooded soil-plant systems, laboratory experiments have been done using95mTc as a tracer. Two common soil types in Japan, Andosol and Gray lowland soils, were used. Soil-plant transfer factors of Tc in rice grain were very low, i.e. 5×10–5 for Andosol and 6×10–4 for Gray lowland soil. It was found that the Tc concentrations in rice plants were influenced by those in soil solutions. Concentrations of95mTc in both soil solutions decreased rapidly in the early period of cultivation. It was observed that redox-potential (Eh) also decreased markedly following flooding. A relationship was found between the decrease of the95mTc concentrations in soil solutions and the drop of Eh in the soils. The Tc (VII) added to soil was transformed to insoluble Tc (IV) under the reduced conditions existing in flooded soil.

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Abstract  

A reliable method for the sampling and analysis of atmospheric iodine species was developed. The air filtering system consisted of a 0.4 m Nuclepore® filter, 47 mm in diameter, for particulate collection followed by two, 47 mm in diameter, cellulose filters for inorganic iodine collection. The latter filters had been impregnated with 1N LiOH in a 10% glycerol-water mixture. The organic iodine was collected by two beds holding 0.2 g of fibriform activated charcoal produced from phenol resin. Supplementation of the charcoal with triethylendiamine (TEDA) enhanced the sorption ability for gaseous iodine. The filters were analyzed by neutron activation analysis. The background radioactivity could be reduced by using the fibriform activated charcoal due to the low content of impurities in the phenol resin. The background count for128I (443 keV) obtained from the fibriform activated charcoal was about one order of magnitude lower than that of the conventional granular one (plant origin). Approximate detection limits for particulate, inorganic and organic iodine were 1, 0.5 and 0.5 ng/m3, respectively, when 50 m3 of air was sampled by this system. The air was sampled at two locations along the coast of Ibaraki, Japan. The concentration ranges of particulate, inorganic and organic iodine were 0.3–3.4, 1.2–3.3 and 7.8–20.4 ng/m3, respectively. Almost 90% of the atmospheric iodine was in a gaseous form in which organic iodine was dominant.

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Abstract  

Analytical method for the determination of129I and127I in environmental samples has been developed by using radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The129I levels in the samples such as soil (0.9–41 mBq/kg), precipitation (0.002–0.11 mBq/kg), pine needles (1.2–32 mBq/kg) and seaweed (<0.1–17 mBq/kg) collected near the nuclear facilities in Tokaimura were higher than those from the other areas in Japan. The highest129I concentration was found in surface soil (0–5 cm), and the highest129I/127I ratios were found in pine needles and precipitation. The129I/127I ratio was higher in rice paddy soil than those in wheat field soil collected around Tokaimura, while the concentration of129I somewhat higher in wheat field soil.

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Abstract  

An analytical method for129I and127I in various environmental samples is described. The method consists of sample digestion by alkali fusion, iodine separation by solvent extraction, neutron irradiation, radiochemical purification of iodine and gamma-spectrometry. The detection limit of129I and the129I/127I ratio are 1·10–3 pCi and 1·10–9, respectively. The range of the129I/127I ratios obtained in the environmental samples collected from the Tokaimura area in Japan was between 1·10–9 and 7.9·10–6. The highest ratio was observed in pine needles followed by rain water, soil, swamp water and algae.

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Abstract  

Neutron activation analysis of129I and127I in soil has been studied. The limit of detection for129I in soil was about 0.05 mBq/kg or 1×10–9 as129I/127I atom ratio. The range of129I concentration in surface soils collected around Tokaimura (Ibaraki Prefecture) was 0.9–41 mBq/kg.Tracer experiments on the adsorption of iodine were also carried out, in order to obtain information on the behaviour of iodine in soil-water systems. Different adsorption patterns of iodide and iodate on soil were found. It was supposed that iodide was adsorbed by the soil fraction which became unstable at about 200° C and iodate by the fraction which was relatively stable to heating.

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Abstract  

A reliable method using 125I tracer for direct determination of volatile iodine formed in aqueous environmental samples was established. Soil solution, seawater and bacterial cell suspension were selected as model samples, and incubated with 125I. Volatile inorganic and organic iodine species produced during incubation were collected in silver wool and activated charcoal traps, separately the efficiency of the traps, the storage conditions of 125I stock solution and the procedures to expel the dissolved volatile iodine from the sample solutions were examined. Formation of biological volatile iodine was observed in all samples, and the dominant iodine species was found to be organic iodine. The advantages of this method are its simplicity, low cost and low detection limit.

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Abstract  

In order to understand the chemical form of soluble technetium in paddy soil and its availability to a rice plant, soil incubation and uptake experiments have been carried out using95mTc as a tracer. The chemical form of the soluble Tc was observed by gel chromatography and found not to be pertechnetate, but rather to be associated with soluble organic matter. An uptake experiment with rice seedlings using nutrient solution showed that this Tc-organic matter complex was less available than pertechnetate.

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