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  • Author or Editor: Yu-Wei Chang x
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Abstract

This study employs the method of direct citation to analyze and compare the interdisciplinary characteristics of the two disciplines of library science and information science during the period of 1978–2007. Based on the research generated by five library science journals and five information science journals, library science researchers tend to cite publications from library and information science (LIS), education, business/management, sociology, and psychology, while researchers of information science tend to cite more publications from LIS, general science, computer science, technology, and medicine. This means that the disciplines with larger contributions to library science are almost entirely different from those contributing to information science. In addition, researchers of library science frequently cite publications from LIS; the rate is as high as 65.61%, which is much higher than the rate for information science, 49.50%. However, a decreasing trend in the percentage of LIS in library science indicates that library science researchers tend to cite more publications from non-LIS disciplines. A rising trend in the proportion of references to education sources is reported for library science articles, while a rising trend in the proportion of references to computer science sources has been found for information science articles. In addition, this study applies an interdisciplinary indicator, Brillouin's Index, to measurement of the degree of interdisciplinarity. The results confirm that the trend toward interdisciplinarity in both information science and library science has risen over the years, although the degree of interdisciplinarity in information science is higher than that in library science.

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Abstract  

Activity concentrations using gamma-ray spectrometer and distributions of natural radionuclides in soil samples collected were investigated to assess the environmental radioactivity and characterization of radiological hazard. The average concentrations of 238U, 232Th series and 40K in the 5 cm depth soil were 22.53, 33.43 and 406.62 Bq kg−1, respectively, which was within world median ranges in the UNSCEAR 2000 report. The average absorbed dose rate estimated by soil activity and annual effective doses were 49.32 nGy h−1 and 60.48 μSv, respectively. Since the soil is an important building material, the mean radium equivalent activity (Ra eq), external (H ex) and internal (H in) hazard index using various models given in the literature for the study area were evaluated as 101.72 Bq kg−1, 0.27 and 0.34, respectively, which were below the recommended limits. The effects of pH value, conductivity, true density and textural properties of soil samples on the natural radionuclide levels were also studied. The application of cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA), coupled with Pearson correlation coefficient analysis, were utilized to analyze the data, identify and clarify the effects of physico-chemical properties on natural radioactivity levels. The CA and PCA results showed that the former method yielded three distinctive groups of the soil variables whereas the latter one yielded the number of variables into three factors with 87.5% variance explanation.

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