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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Erden Erol Ünlüer
,
Seran Ünlüer
,
Yusuf Şahin
,
Kemal Erdinç Kamer
,
Arif Karagöz
, and
Gözde Canan Tan

Mesenteric cysts are benign cystic lesions. Here, we present the case of a patient with abdominal pain, which was diagnosed as mesenteric cyst.

A 28-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and distention. Abdominal palpation revealed a smooth-surfaced mass palpable in the left upper quadrant. Ultrasonography depicted a hypoechoic heterogeneous mass-like structure with a size of 15 × 12 cm. Computerized tomography (CT) showed a well-defined cystic structure with a size of 12 × 12.5 cm near to the duodenum and pancreas. The patient was admitted, and the cystic structure was drained with a percutaneous drainage catheter; then, sclerotherapy was performed using ethyl alcohol with the aid of ultrasonography. The material was sent to the pathology lab and revealed negative results for malignant cell and mucin. The patient underwent a control CT with contrast, which revealed the catheter at the site of the operation and no cystic lesion after procedure. He was discharged 1 week after the procedure.

Mesenteric cysts are extremely rare benign lesions of the abdomen, and emergency physicians must consider this disease in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. The percutaneous drainage technique performed on our patient is a safe technique for the treatment of selected patients.

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Erden Erol Ünlüer
,
Yusuf Şahin
,
Orhan Oyar
,
Gözde Canan Tan
,
Arif Karagöz
, and
Celaleddin Turan

Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EP) is a rare form of necrotizing pyelonephritis. It is a life-threatening condition that usually affects patients with diabetes, and a small percentage may be due to urinary tract obstruction. Here, we present the case of an EP caused by urinary tract obstruction without diabetes. A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with fever, chills, and abdominal pain. There was no significant past history. Physical examination depicted bilateral lower abdominal and right flank knocking tenderness. Laboratory exams revealed leukocytosis, neutrophilia, a high C-reactive protein level, and pyuria. Abdominal computerized tomography (CT) showed diffuse gas in the right renal collecting system and dilatation of the right renal pelvis compared to the right side, in addition to multiple millimetric stones located in the right kidney and right ureter. After emergent placement of a percutaneous nephrostomy, she was admitted. Control abdominal CT without contrast revealed the absence of gas, hydronephrosis of the right renal pelvis, and the presence of nephrolithiasis. The patient was discharged 10 days of post-procedure with instructions for follow-up. Emergency physicians need to remain alert about this life-threatening disease and the typical CT findings of this disease to make a timely diagnosis and navigate management.

Open access
Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors:
Yusuf Emre Ozdemir
,
Burak Kizilcay
,
Muge Sonmezisik
,
Muhammet Salih Tarhan
,
Deniz Borcak
,
Meryem Sahin Ozdemir
,
Osman Faruk Bayramlar
,
Zuhal Yesilbag
,
Sevtap Senoglu
,
Habip Gedik
,
Hayat Kumbasar Karaosmanoglu
, and
Kadriye Kart Yasar

Abstract

We aimed to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in terms of disease severity, need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and death. In addition, we determined the factors affecting the COVID-19 severity in vaccinated patients. Patients aged 18–65 years who were hospitalized for COVID-19 between September and December 2021 were retrospectively analyzed in three groups: unvaccinated, partially vaccinated, and fully vaccinated.

A total of 854 patients were included. Mean age was 47.9 ± 10.6 years, 474 patients (55.5%) were male. Of these, 230 patients (26.9%) were fully vaccinated, 97 (11.3%) were partially vaccinated, and 527 (61.7%) were unvaccinated. Of the fully vaccinated patients, 67% (n = 153) were vaccinated with CoronaVac and 33% (n = 77) were vaccinated with Pfizer-BioNTech. All patients (n = 97) with a single dose were vaccinated with Pfizer-BioNTech. One hundred thirteen (13.2%) patients were transferred to ICU. A hundred (11.7%) patients were intubated and 77 (9.0%) patients died. Advanced age (P = 0.028, 95% CI = 1.00–1.07, OR = 1.038) and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) (P < 0.001, 95% CI = 1.20–1.69, OR = 1.425) were associated with increased mortality, while being fully vaccinated (P = 0.008, 95% CI = 0.23–0.80, OR = 0.435) was associated with survival in multivariate analysis. Full dose vaccination reduced the need for ICU admission by 49.7% (95% CI = 17–70) and mortality by 56.5% (95% CI = 20–77). When the fully vaccinated group was evaluated, we found that death was observed more frequent in patients with CCI>3 (19.1 vs 5.8%, P < 0.01, OR = 3.7). Therefore, the booster vaccine especially in individuals with comorbidities should not be delayed, since the survival expectation is low in patients with a high comorbidity index.

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