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  • Author or Editor: Z.F. Wang x
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Abstract  

Intact chloroplasts were isolated from mesophyll protoplasts of Brassia napus. Concentrations of 8 rare earth elements (REEs) in the chloroplasts were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The results showed that there were trace amounts of REEs in the chloroplasts, which corresponded to 1 atom of REEs per 2000 chlorophyll molecules. About 30% of the total REEs in the leaves are localized in the chloroplasts and the light REEs were enriched with respect to the heavy elements of the series.

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Abstract  

A method of efficiency calibration for the measurement of 88Kr and 138Xe by HPGe γ-spectrometer is proposed in the present paper. The question for the efficient calibration is, how to achieve homogeneous sources of 88Kr-88Rb and 138Xe-138Cs. The fission product gases were obtained by irradiating a precisely measured amount of U3O8 (90% 235U) filled in a quartz glass ampoule. Source cell was first filled up with stearic acid, and then the fission product gases were charged into it. Xenon and krypton are not adsorbed on stearic acid, therefore, homogeneous sources of 88Kr-88Rb and 138Xe-138Cs can be prepared. The results of the experiment demonstrate that the method is feasible and successful.

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Abstract  

The contents of eight rare earth elements (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu) in various plant species taken from a rare earth ore area were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. For a given plant, the REE patterns in root, leaf and host soil are different from each other. The REE distribution characteristics in roots of various species are very similar and resemble those in the surface water. The results of this study suggest that there is no significant fractionation between the REEs during their uptake by the plant roots from soil solution. However, the variation of the relative abundance of individual REE occurs in the process of transportation and deposition of REEs in plants.

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Abstract  

In this work some calorimetric measurements were also carried out on the electrorefining silver by using different current densities with a Calvet type microcalorimeter at room temperature. The ratio (R) of the measured heat (

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m) to the input electric energy (
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in) and the excess heat (
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ex), i.e., difference between
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m and
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in during the electrorefining process, were discussed in terms of general thermodynamics. It was found that the R and
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ex for silver were related with the current density or cell voltage employed in the experiment. The results obtained here also indicate that the heat generation under different conditions, such as different currents or voltages may be caused partially by the irreversibility of the process or by some unknown processes.

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Abstract  

Conducting polyaniline/Cobaltosic oxide (PANI/Co3O4) composites were synthesized for the first time, by in situ deposition technique in the presence of hydrochloric acid (HCl) as a dopant by adding the fine grade powder (an average particle size of approximately 80 nm) of Co3O4 into the polymerization reaction mixture of aniline. The composites obtained were characterized by infrared spectra (IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composition and the thermal stability of the composites were investigated by TG-DTG. The results suggest that the thermal stability of the composites is higher than that of the pure PANI. The improvement in the thermal stability for the composites is attributed to the interaction between PANI and nano-Co3O4.

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New high-molecular-weight glutenin (HMW glutenin) sequences isolated from six Psathyrostachys juncea accessions by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR differ from previous sequences from this species. They showed novel modifications in all of the structural domains, with unique C-terminal residues, and their N-terminal lengths were the longest among the HMW glutenins reported to date. In their repetitive domains, there were three repeatable motif units: 13-residue [GYWH(/I/Y)YT(/Q)S(/T)VTSPQQ], hexapeptide (PGQGQQ), and tetrapeptide (ITVS). The 13-residue repeats were restricted to the current sequences, while the tetrapeptides were only shared by D-hordein and the current sequences. However, these sequences were not expressed as normal HMW glutenin proteins because an in-frame stop codon located in the C-termini interrupted the intact open reading frames. A phylogenetic analysis supported different origins of the P. juncea HMW glutenin sequences than that revealed by a previous study. The current sequences showed a close relationship with D-hordein but appeared to be more primitive.

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Abstract  

As one primary component of Vitamin B3, nicotinic acid [pyridine 3-carboxylic acid] was synthesized, and calorimetric study and thermal analysis for this compound were performed. The low-temperature heat capacity of nicotinic acid was measured with a precise automated adiabatic calorimeter over the temperature rang from 79 to 368 K. No thermal anomaly or phase transition was observed in this temperature range. A solid-to-solid transition at T trs=451.4 K, a solid-to-liquid transition at T fus=509.1 K and a thermal decomposition at T d=538.8 K were found through the DSC and TG-DTG techniques. The molar enthalpies of these transitions were determined to be Δtrs H m=0.81 kJ mol-1, Δfus H m=27.57 kJ mol-1 and Δd H m=62.38 kJ mol-1, respectively, by the integrals of the peak areas of the DSC curves.

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Abstract

This study optimised the hydrolysis process of chicken plasma protein and explored the in vivo antioxidant activity of its hydrolysates. The results showed that alkaline protease provided the highest degree of hydrolysis (19.30%), the best antioxidant effect in vitro. The optimal hydrolysis process of alkaline protease was: temperature 50 °C, time 8 h, [E]/[S] 7000 U g−1, pH 7.5. Antioxidant studies in vivo showed that the low, medium, and high dose groups significantly reduced the serum MDA and protein carbonyl content (P < 0.05) and significantly increased the serum SOD and GSH contents (P < 0.05). The results of HE staining of the liver showed that the liver cells in the model group were severely damaged, but the chicken plasma protein hydrolysates could alleviate this pathological damage. Chicken plasma protein hydrolysis products had certain antioxidant activity.

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