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Wheat-rye 1BL.1RS translocations have been widely used in wheat breeding programs. A 1BL.1RS translocation wheat line, 91S-23, was developed from a 1R monosomic addition of the rye (Secale cereale) inbred line L155 into wheat (Triticum aestivum) MY11. A new commercial wheat cultivar, CN18, which also contained the 1BL.1RS translocation, was derived from the cross MY11 × 91S-23. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that the rye centromere was eliminated from the 1BL.1RS chromosomes of CN18 but not from 91S-23. Based on the 1RS source and the centromeric structure of the translocation chromosome, CN18 qualifies as a new wheat cultivar possessing a 1BL.1RS translocation. CN18 displayed high yield performance and resistance to powdery mildew and stripe rust, whereas 91S-23 was susceptible to these diseases. The present study provides a new 1RS resource for wheat improvement.

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Abstract  

The title compound 3,3-dinitroazetidinium (DNAZ) 3,5-dinitrosalicylate (3,5-DNSA) was prepared and the crystal structure has been determined by a four-circle X-ray diffractometer. The thermal behavior of the title compound was studied under a non-isothermal condition by DSC and TG/DTG techniques. The kinetic parameters were obtained from analysis of the TG curves by Kissinger method, Ozawa method, the differential method and the integral method. The kinetic model function in differential form and the value of E a and A of the decomposition reaction of the title compound are f(α)=4α3/4, 130.83 kJ mol−1 and 1013.80s−1, respectively. The critical temperature of thermal explosion of the title compound is 147.55 °C. The values of ΔS , ΔH and ΔG of this reaction are −1.35 J mol−1 K−1, 122.42 and 122.97 kJ mol−1, respectively. The specific heat capacity of the title compound was determined with a continuous C p mode of mircocalorimeter. Using the relationship between C p and T and the thermal decomposition parameters, the time of the thermal decomposition from initiation to thermal explosion (adiabatic time-to-explosion) was obtained.

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The most abundant seed storage proteins of wheat are gliadins and glutenins. Gliadins, including α/β, γ and ω types, are normally monomeric proteins and account for about 50% of the gluten proteins. In this study, 55 sequences of γ -gliadin genes were obtained from species of Sitopsis section, the deduced B genome donors of wheat. Despite the high sequence similarities to the known γ -gliadin genes, extensive variations were also found. Using the extensive sequence information deposited in database and obtained in this study, a comprehensive classification of the γ -gliadin multigene families were performed based on the primary structures and phylogenic analysis. All the γ -gliadin genes analyzed could be divided into 2 types, which contain 8 and 9 cysteines, respectively. Type I (with 8 cysteines) and type II (with 9 cysteines) are further classified to 7 and 4 groups, respectively, and several subgroups are also identified. The genes derived from A, B and D genomes of common wheat were clustered distinctly, indicating that there was apparent genomic specificity in γ -gliadins genes. Besides the high homology between γ -gliadin genes from Sitopsis species and B genome of wheat, some unique groups or subgroups were also identified in Sitopsis section, suggesting that it could be considered as a valuable source of γ -gliadin genes. The comparison of deduced primary structures of each group and/or subgroup was conducted, from which their evolution and quality properties were also speculated.

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Temperature uniformity and heating rate subjected to radio frequency (RF) heating have major impact on the quality of treated low moisture foods. The objective of this paper was to analyse the influence of electrode distance on the heating behaviour of RF on condition that the sample shape, size, and location between the electrodes were defined. Considering peanut butter (PB) and wheat flour (WF) as sample food, a 3D computer simulation model was developed using COMSOL, which was experimentally validated by a RF machine (27.12 MHz, 6 kW). Specifically, the electrode distances were selected as 84, 89, 93, 99 and 89, 93, 98, 103 (mm) for RF heating of PB and WF, respectively. Results showed that the simulated results and experimental data agreed well; the temperature-time histories of the RF heating of PB and WF were approximate straight lines; both the temperature uniformity index and the heating rate decreased with the increase of the electrode distance; the heating rate had a negative logarithmic linear relationship with the electrode distance, which was independent of the types, geometry shapes and sizes of low moisture foods.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: S.F. Dai, D.Y. Xu, Z.J. Wen, Z.P. Song, H.X. Chen, H.Y Li, J.R. Li, L.Z. Kang, and Z.H. Yan

A novel 4.0-kb Fy was sequenced and bacterially expressed. This gene, the largest y-type HMW-GS currently reported, is 4,032-bp long and encodes a mature protein with 1,321 amino acid (AA) residues. The 4.0-kb Fy shows novel modifications in all domains. In the N-terminal, it contains only 67 AA residues, as three short peptides are absent. In the repetitive domain, the undecapeptide RYYPSVTSPQQ is completely lost and the dodecapeptide GSYYPGQTSPQQ is partially absent. A novel motif unit, PGQQ, is present in addition to the two standard motif units PGQGQQ and GYYPTSPQQ. Besides, an extra cysteine residue also occurs in the middle of this domain. The large molecular mass of the 4.0-kb Fy is mainly due to the presence of an extra-long repetitive domain with 1,279 AA residues. The novel 4.0-kb Fy gene is of interest in HMW-GS gene evolution as well as to wheat quality improvement with regard to its longest repetitive domain length and extra cysteines residues.

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Plant-plant interaction plays a key role in regulating the composition and structure of communities and ecosystems. Studies of plant-plant interactions in forest ecosystems have mainly concentrated on growth effects of neighboring plants on target trees. Physiological effects of neighboring plants on target trees, in particular understorey effects on physiology of overstorey trees, have received less attention. It is still unclear what is the physiological mechanisms underlying positive growth effects of understorey removal, although understorey removal has been applied to improve the wood production for hundreds of years worldwide. Only 17.5% of published works dealt with understorey-overstorey interactions and only a few of those researched the understorey effects on the physiology of overstorey trees. Case studies indicated that overstorey Abies faxoniana trees grown with different understorey shrubs showed significantly different levels of tissue nitrogen and mobile carbohydrates. Removal experiment showed that nitrogen and mobile carbohydrates concentrations in Cunninghamia lanceolata trees grown in the absence of understorey shrubs differed significantly (pure stand > mixture) with those in trees grown in the presence of understorey shrubs, in particular during the dry season. This review highlighted that the neighboring woody plants affect Cand N-physiology in overstorey trees. These effects may be mainly resulted from underground competition for soil water rather than for other resources as the effects were more pronounced during the dry season. The present review suggests that positive effects of neighboring removal (e.g., understorey removal, thinning) on overstorey trees can be expected more rapidly and strongly in stressful area (e.g., low rainfall, nutrient-poor site) than in areas with optimal growth conditions. Hence, ecophysiology-based management strategies for dealing with neighboring plants in forest ecosystems should take into account: 1) site conditions, 2) timing, duration and frequency of management practices, and 3) species-specific properties and other aspects such as biodiversity conservation and soil erosion.

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Abstract

Phase behavior of dodecane–tetradecane (n-C12H26–C14H30, n-C12–C14) binary system in bulk and confined in SBA-15 (pore diameters 8 nm; 15.9 nm) has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy. The bulk system possesses some special phases relating to the rotator phase in normal alkanes. Dodecane–tetradecane mixtures confined in SBA-15 (8 nm) are a system miscible both in solid and liquid states with a phase diagram of a smooth curve. Dodecane–tetradecane system confined in SBA-15 (15.9 nm) exhibits not only solid–liquid (s–l) in all compositions but solid–solid transition in mole fractions of tetradecane 0.1–0.6, which forms a phase diagram of “loop line” shape. Melting temperatures of n-C12–C14/SBA-15 (8 nm) are lower than those of n-C12–C14/SBA-15 (15.9 nm) in all mole fractions. The evolution of the phase diagram of n-C12–C14 confined in 8 nm, 15.9 nm pore sizes of SBA-15 and in bulk, respectively, shows a dramatic effect of confinement on phase behavior of normal alkane mixtures. The s–l phase boundary lines of n-C12–C14/SBA-15 (8, 15.9 nm) are fitted as being [], where D is a polynomial ∑ a i x i, i = 1, 2,···, n (A = C14, B = C12).

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Summary  

The comprehension of the behavior of radioactive nuclides in aquifer requires the study of the sorption processes of nuclides in various geochemical conditions. The sorption/desorption of 65Zn(II) on surface sediments (0-2 cm) was investigated by batch method in sea water (pH 8.20, 35‰ salinity, filtered by 0.45mm) at ambient temperature. The surface sediments were obtained from four stations around the Daya Bay of Guangdong Province (China), where the first nuclear power station of China has been running from 1994. The sorption process is fast initially and around 39% average of sorption percentage (SP%) can be quickly obtained in 15 minutes for all the surface sediments. Then, the sorption percentage becomes constant. In 30 days of contact time 79.6% sorption percentage and K d=3.9. 103ml/g distribution coefficient was obtained. The value of K dbecame constant, 4.0. 103ml/g, in contact time more than 120 hours. The distribution coefficient K ddecreases with increasing sediment concentration from 4.0 to 250 mg/l from 1.31. 104to 1.68. 103ml/g, respectively. Then the value of K dgoes up to 5.38. 103ml/g with sediment concentration of 3000 mg/l. The desorption experiments suggest that the sorption of Zn(II) is irreversible with a hyteresis coefficient of 66%.

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New high-molecular-weight glutenin (HMW glutenin) sequences isolated from six Psathyrostachys juncea accessions by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR differ from previous sequences from this species. They showed novel modifications in all of the structural domains, with unique C-terminal residues, and their N-terminal lengths were the longest among the HMW glutenins reported to date. In their repetitive domains, there were three repeatable motif units: 13-residue [GYWH(/I/Y)YT(/Q)S(/T)VTSPQQ], hexapeptide (PGQGQQ), and tetrapeptide (ITVS). The 13-residue repeats were restricted to the current sequences, while the tetrapeptides were only shared by D-hordein and the current sequences. However, these sequences were not expressed as normal HMW glutenin proteins because an in-frame stop codon located in the C-termini interrupted the intact open reading frames. A phylogenetic analysis supported different origins of the P. juncea HMW glutenin sequences than that revealed by a previous study. The current sequences showed a close relationship with D-hordein but appeared to be more primitive.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: G. Chen, M.H. Zhang, X.J. Liu, J.Y. Fu, H.Y. Li, M. Hao, S.Z. Ning, Z.W. Yuan, Z.H. Yan, B.H. Wu, D.C. Liu, and L.Q. Zhang

Premature termination codons (PTCs) are an important reason for the silence of highmolecular- weight glutenin subunits in Triticum species. Although the Glu-A1y gene is generally silent in common wheat, we here isolated an expressed Glu-A1y gene containing a PTC, named 1Ay8.3, from Triticum monococcum ssp. monococcum (AmAm, 2n = 2x = 14). Despite the presence of a PTC (TAG) at base pair positions 1879–1881 in the C-terminal coding region, this did not obviously affect 1Ay8.3 expression in seeds. This was demonstrated by the fact that when the PTC TAG of 1Ay8.3 was mutated to the CAG codon, the mutant in Escherichia coli bacterial cells expressed the same subunit as in the seeds. However, in E. coli, 1Ay8.3 containing the PTC expressed a truncated protein with faster electrophoretic mobility than that in seeds, suggesting that PTC translation termination suppression probably occurs in vivo (seeds) but not in vitro (E. coli). This may represent one of only a few reports on the PTC termination suppression phenomenon in genes.

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