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Flour from grains originating from plants infected artificially with cereal aphids were analyzed for glutenin and gliadin and total protein content, using Size Exclusion HPLC. Wheat plants were caged at the beginning of stem elongation. Cages were treated with 0.1 % methyl parathion. One week later, the caged plants were artificially infected with 5 aptera individuals of Metopolophium dirhodum, Diuraphis noxia, Sitobion avenae and Rhopalosiphum padi . It was found that aphid infection had significant effect on the glutenin and gliadin content, the total protein content and the gliadin/glutenin ratio. Both the glutenin and gliadin content was significantly higher in the seeds harvested from aphid infected plants. However, the gliadin/glutenin ratio was significantly lower in wheat flour prepared from aphid infected plants than in those from uninfected control. The most significant decrease in gliadin/glutenin ratio was caused by M. dirhodum, D. noxia, S. avenae infection followed by R. padi at high-abundance. As the gliadin/glutenin ratio was significantly lower in flours made from aphid infected wheat seeds, it may be suggested, that aphid feeding results in decreased bread making quality of wheat flour.

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Functional morphology of Helix pomatia salivary gland cells was studied at light microscopic level by using different histochemical methods. Three cell types could be demonstrated in the salivary gland: mucocytes, granular and vacuolated cells. The distribution and the number of the different cell types were different in active and inactive snails. In active feeding animals, dilatated interlobular salivary ducts were observed, which were never present in inactive ones. In active animals an additional cell type, the cystic cell could also be observed. Periodic acid Schiff staining revealed both mucuos and serous elements in the salivary gland. Furthermore, hematoxyline-eosin staining indicated the occurrence of a cell layer with high mitotic activity in the acini. Applying immunohistochemical methods with monoclonal mouse anti-human Ki-67 clone, B56 and polyclonal rabbit anti-human Ki-67 antibodies, we also were able to demonstrate the occurrence of dividing cells in the salivary gland. Analysis of 1-2 µm semi-thin Araldite sections stained with toluidine-blue showed that the saliva can be released, in addition to possible exocytosis, by the lysis of cystic cells. Using an apoptosis kit, we could also establish that this process was due to rather an apoptotic than a necrotic mechanism. In the salivary gland of active snails, where an intensive salivation takes place, significantly more apoptotic cells occurred, if compared to that of inactive animals. It is suggested that programmed cell death may also be involved in the saliva release.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: K. T. Kiss, Zs Trábert, and M. Duleba
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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors: K. T. Kiss, Zs. Trábert, and M. Duleba
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Building life cycle assessment is getting more and more attention within the topic of environmental impact caused by the built environment. Although more and more research focus on the embodied impact of buildings, the investigation of the operational energy use still needs attention. The majority of the building stock still does not comply with the nearly zero energy requirements. Also, in case of retrofitting, when most of the embodied impact is already spent on the existing structures (and so immutable), the importance of the operational energy rises. There are several methods to calculate the energy performance of buildings covering the range from simplified seasonal methods to detailed hourly energy simulations. Not only the accuracy of the calculations, but the computational time can be significantly different within the methods. The latter is especially important in case of optimization, when there is limited time to perform one calculation. Our research shows that the use of different calculation techniques can lead to different optima for environmental impacts in case of retrofitting. In this paper we compare these calculation methods with focus on computational time, accuracy and applicability to environmental optimization of buildings. We present the results in a case study of the retrofitting of a middle-sized apartment house in Hungary.

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Species-specific PCR assay was used for the identification of Hungarian Fusarium graminearum isolates in pure mycelial culture. The Fg16F/Fg16R primer pair of the three known species-specific primers appeared to be the most appropriate one to identify F. graminearum .Two methods were used for comparative determination of the amplicon size of F. graminearum strains: traditional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chip electrophoresis. Our results have shown that the chip electrophoresis is an easy-to-use, time-efficient substitute for conventional agarose gel electrophoresis; moreover it provides a more precise size determination of amplicons. Amplicon size ranging from 415 bp to 421 bp in tested isolates may be associated with genetic diversity in the Hungarian population of F. graminearum .The PCR assay described in this study can be used for the routine detection and identification of F. graminearum without isolation and morphological investigation of this fungus.

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Enniatins (ENs), produced by Fusarium species are a group of mycotoxins with antimicrobial, insecticidal (GROVE & POPLE, 1980) and phytotoxic activities. PCR based assays were applied for detecting enniatin-producing strains of Fusarium avenaceum, F. poae and F. sporotrichioides isolated from wheat seeds originated of 30 geographic localities of Hungary. All F. sporotrichoides strains and except two of all F. poae strains gave positive signal to esysp1 and esysp2 primers as well as all F. avenaceum isolates were positive to esya1 and esya2 primers indicating the ability to produce ENs. This is a first report of the enniatin producing ability of Fusarium species associated to wheat in Hungary.

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