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To screen fecal samples for adenovirus antigens a genus-specific monoclonal antibody based enzyme immunoassay was developed. In a comparative analysis with commercial latex agglutination test, high sensitivity was demonstrated. The assay did not detect other viruses usually found in faeces suggesting its specificity. One hundred and eighty stool samples collected in Baranya County were tested and 13 (7.2%) of them showed reactivity. The application of our immunoassay combined with other, more sophisticated methods may help us to determine the serotype specificity of these adenovirus isolates and assess the importance of adenoviruses in viral gastroenteritis.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional quality of homemade beef sausages by examining the amino acid, biogenic amine, and fatty acid composition. The most abundant amino acids were Ala (15.56%), Leu (13.28%), Gly (8.64%), Pro (8.41%), Ser (8.26%), and Val (7.65%). The essential amino acids accounted for 44.30% of total amino acids. Apart from the protein building amino acids, the free amino acid content was relatively high, accounting for 10% of total amino acid content. The average biogenic amine concentration in the sausage samples was low (1.69 mg kg−1). Saturated fatty acids accounted for 59.10% of total fatty acids, followed by monounsaturated (38.63%) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (2.27%). The fatty acid profile was dominated by oleic (C18:1, 34.37%) and palmitic (C16:0, 30.24%) acids, and short-chain fatty acids were also present, which may have a positive impact on gut health. The results show that beef sausages have a high nutritional value and are a good source of essential amino acids, free amino acids, and fatty acids that are important for human health.

Open access
Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
Gábor Skaliczki
,
M. Weszl
,
K. Schandl
,
T. Major
,
M. Kovács
,
J. Skaliczki
,
H. Redl
,
M. Szendrői
,
K. Szigeti
,
D. Máté
,
Cs Dobó-Nagy
, and
Zs Lacza

Purpose: The clinical demand for bone grafting materials necessitated the development of animal models. Critical size defect model has been criticized recently, mainly for its inaccuracy. Our objective was to develop a dependable animal model that would provide compromised bone healing, and would allow the investigation of bone substitutes. Methods: In the first group a critical size defect was created in the femur of adult male Wistar rats, and a non-critical defect in the remaining animals (Groups II, III and IV). The defect was left empty in group II, while in groups III and IV a spacer was interposed into the gap. Osteoblast activity was evaluated by NanoSPECT/CT imaging system. New bone formation and assessment of a union or non-union was observed by μCT and histology. Results: The interposition model proved to be highly reproducible and provided a bone defect with compromised bone healing. Significant bone regeneration processes were observed four weeks after removal of the spacer. Conclusion: Our results have shown that when early bone healing is inhibited by the physical interposition of a spacer, the regeneration process is compromised for a further 4 weeks and results in a bone defect during the time-course of the study.

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
Cs. Molnár
,
Zs. Molnár
,
Z. Barina
,
N. Bauer
,
M. Biró
,
L. Bodonczi
,
A. Csathó
,
J. Csiky
,
J. Deák
,
G. Fekete
,
K. Harmos
,
A. Horváth
,
I. Isépy
,
M. Juhász
,
J. Kállayné Szerényi
,
G. Király
,
G. Magos
,
A. Máté
,
A. Mesterházy
,
A. Molnár
,
J. Nagy
,
M. Óvári
,
D. Purger
,
D. Schmidt
,
G. Sramkó
,
V. Szénási
,
F. Szmorad
,
Gy. Szollát
,
T. Tóth
,
T. Vidra
, and
V. Virók

The first version of the map of the Hungarian vegetation-based landscape regions were prepared at the scale of 1: 200,000 (1 km or higher resolution). The primary goal of the map was to provide an exact background for the presentation and evaluation of the data of the MÉTA database. Secondly, we intended to give an up-to-date and detailed vegetation-based division of Hungary with a comprehensive nomenclature of the regions. Regions were primarily defined on the basis of their present zonal vegetation, or their dominant extrazonal or edaphic vegetation. Where this was not possible, abiotic factors that influence the potential vegetation, the flora were taken into consideration, thus, political and economical factors were ignored. All region borders were defined by local expert botanists, mainly based on their field knowledge. The map differs in many features from the currently used, country-wide, flora-or geography-based divisions in many features. We consider our map to be temporary (i.e. a work map), and we plan to refine and improve it after 5 years of testing.

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