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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors:
L. G. Puskás
,
L. Tiszlavicz
,
Zs. Rázga
,
L. L. Torday
,
T. Krenács
, and
J. Gy. Papp

Recent and historical evidence is consistent with the view that atherosclerosis is an infectious disease or microbial toxicosis impacted by genetics and behavior. Because small bacterial-like particles, also known as nanobacteria have been detected in kidney stones, kidney and liver cyst fluids, and can form a calcium apatite coat we posited that this agent is present in calcified human atherosclerotic plaques. Carotid and aortic atherosclerotic plaques and blood samples collected at autopsy were examined for nanobacteria-like structures by light microscopy (hematoxylin-eosin and a calcium-specific von Kossa staining), immuno-gold labeling for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for specific nanobacterial antigens, and propagation from homogenized, filtered specimens in culture medium. Nanobacterial antigens were identified in situ by immuno-TEM in 9 of 14 plaque specimens, but none of the normal carotid or aortic tissue (5 specimens). Nanobacteria-like particles were propagated from 26 of 42 sclerotic aorta and carotid samples and were confirmed by dot immunoblot, light microscopy and TEM. [3H]L-aspartic acid was incorporated into high molecular weight compounds of demineralized particles. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA sequences from the particles was unsuccessful by traditional protocols. Identification of nanobacteria-like particles at the lesion supports, but does not by itself prove the hypothesis that these agents contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, especially vascular calcifications.

Restricted access
Nanopages
Authors:
I. Szendrő
,
K. Erdélyi
,
Zs. Puskás
,
M. Fábián
,
N. Adányi
, and
K. Somogyi

Due to the changes of the refractive indices, the planar optical waveguides are sensitive to the surrounding media, to the adsorbates, etc. on their surface. The sensitivity of such a waveguide layer can be enhanced when its thickness is lowered down to the nanometer range. Such sensors can be successfully operated both in inorganic chemistry and in life sciences as label free biosensors. Principles and some results are demonstrated. Further on, application of transparent conductive oxides for voltammetric measurements in combination with the classical waveguide sensor will be demonstrated. Development and results of a combined system is described and first results with simultaneous measurements are demonstrated. An indium tin oxide nanolayer is deposited and activated on the top of the sensor chip. This electrically conductive oxide layer serves as working electrode in the specially developed electrochemical cuvette. In this work results are presented for simultaneous use of these two methods and for simultaneous measurement of refractive index changes of the waveguiding system and that of electrical current changes. The first basic results are demonstrated using H2O2 and dye solutions, using KCl and TRIS as buffer and transport media.

Open access