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  • Author or Editor: Zsuzsanna Ötvös x
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The fifteenth-century manuscript Suppl. Gr. 45 (Austrian National Library, ÖNB, Vienna) contains an extensive Greek-Latin dictionary, where one can find a great number of marginal notes written by different hands and in different languages (Greek, Latin and Italian). Approximately sixty of these glossary notes are quotations from the well-known Byzantine code of law, the Basilika (9th century), which was initiated by Emperor Basil I and completed under the reign of his successor, Leo VI the Wise. In my paper, I intend to examine these marginal notes and argue that their direct source text is not the monumental code of law, the Basilika itself, but rather its abridged version from the 10th cent., the SynopsisMaior Basilicorum.

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The present paper aims at examining the manuscript recorded as ÖNB Suppl. Gr. No. 45 in the Austrian National Library which was attributed to Janus Pannonius until recently. Firstly, the opposing opinions of J. Bick, Cs. Csapodi and I. Kapitánffy are to be presented in connection with the authorship of the Vocabularium . Secondly, the arrangement of the word list is described with a focus on scribal errors revealing the mechanics of the transcription of the text. Then glossary notes by different Latin and Greek hands are described and classified with an emphasis on the possible identification of two Greek hands. Finally, an attempt is made to reconstruct the history of the codex partially on the basis of its three bookplates attached on each other by subsequent possessors.

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The present paper aims at examining the phonetic characteristics of the Latin in Narbonensis as reflected by the local inscriptions. Data will be presented from a limited corpus: from Fréjus (Forum Iulii), Antibes (Antipolis), Riez (Reii Apollinares), Digne (Dinia), Aix-en-Provence (Aquae Sextiae), Apt (Apta Iulia), Vienne (Vienna) and their territories. The inscriptions from these areas have been republished recently with the addition of some newly discovered inscriptions. Thus, this epigraphic material needs reconsideration in order to see whether the data collected from the new annotated edition corroborate or refute the existing findings of Vulgar Latin research.

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