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Abstract  

Marcinkiewicz laws of large numbers for φ-mixing strictly stationary sequences with r-th moment barely divergent, 0 < r < 2, are established. For this dependent analogs of the Lévy-Ottaviani-Etemadi and Hoffmann-Jørgensen inequalities are revisited.

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This note concerns the asymptotic behavior of a Markov process obtained from normalized products of independent and identically distributed random matrices. The weak convergence of this process is proved, as well as the law of large numbers and the central limit theorem.

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We prove that the “quadratic irrational rotation” exhibits a central limit theorem. More precisely, let α be an arbitrary real root of a quadratic equation with integer coefficients; say, α =

\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\sqrt 2$$ \end{document}
. Given any rational number 0 < x < 1 (say, x = 1/2) and any positive integer n, we count the number of elements of the sequence α, 2α, 3α, …, modulo 1 that fall into the subinterval [0, x]. We prove that this counting number satisfies a central limit theorem in the following sense. First, we subtract the “expected number” nx from the counting number, and study the typical fluctuation of this difference as n runs in a long interval 1 ≤ nN. Depending on α and x, we may need an extra additive correction of constant times logarithm of N; furthermore, what we always need is a multiplicative correction: division by (another) constant times square root of logarithm of N. If N is large, the distribution of this renormalized counting number, as n runs in 1 ≤ nN, is very close to the standard normal distribution (bell shaped curve), and the corresponding error term tends to zero as N tends to infinity. This is the main result of the paper (see Theorem 1.1). The proof is rather complicated and long; it has many interesting detours and byproducts. For example, the exact determination of the key constant factors (in the additive and multiplicative norming), which depend on α and x, requires surprisingly deep algebraic tools such as Dedeking sums, the class number of quadratic fields, and generalized class number formulas. The crucial property of a quadratic irrational is the periodicity of its continued fraction. Periodicity means self-similarity, which leads us to Markov chains: our basic probabilistic tool to prove the central limit theorem. We also use a lot of Fourier analysis. Finally, I just mention one byproduct of this research: we solve an old problem of Hardy and Littlewood on diophantine sums. The whole paper consists of an introduction and 17 sections. Part 1 contains the Introduction and Sections 1–7.

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We consider an empirical process based upon ratios of selected pairs of spacings, generated by independent samples of arbitrary sizes. As a main result, we show that when both samples are uniformly distributed on (possibly shifted) intervals of equal lengths, this empirical process converges to a mean-centered Brownian bridge of the form B C(u) = B(u)−6Cu(1−u) Σ0 1 B(s)ds, where B(·) denotes a Brownian bridge, and C, a constant. The investigation of the class of Gaussian processes {B C(·): C ∈ ℝ} leads to some unexpected distributional identities such as B 2(·)

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B(·). We discuss this and similar results in an extended framework.

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We use the method of moments to establish the limiting spectral distribution (LSD) of appropriately scaled large dimensional random symmetric circulant, reverse circulant, Toeplitz and Hankel matrices which have suitable band structures. The input sequence used to construct these matrices is assumed to be either i.i.d. with mean zero and variance one or independent and appropriate finite fourth moment. The class of LSD includes the normal and the symmetrized square root of chi-square with two degrees of freedom. In several other cases, explicit forms of the limit do not seem to be obtainable but the limits can be shown to be symmetric and their second and the fourth moments can be calculated with some effort. Simulations suggest some further properties of the limits.

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