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fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is a proposed condition (not yet a legitimate diagnosis) that refers to persistent and recurrent gaming associated with clinical impairment

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This commentary supports the argument that there is an increasing tendency to subsume a range of excessive daily behaviors under the rubric of non-substance related behavioral addictions. The concept of behavioral addictions gained momentum in the 1990s with the recent reclassification of pathological gambling as a non-substance behavioral addiction in DSM-5 accelerating this process. The propensity to label a host of normal behaviors carried out to excess as pathological based simply on phenomenological similarities to addictive disorders will ultimately undermine the credibility of behavioral addiction as a valid construct. From a scientific perspective, anecdotal observation followed by the subsequent modification of the wording of existing substance dependence diagnostic criteria, and then searching for biopsychosocial correlates to justify classifying an excessive behavior resulting in harm as an addiction falls far short of accepted taxonomic standards. The differentiation of normal from non-substance addictive behaviors ought to be grounded in sound conceptual, theoretical and empirical methodologies. There are other more parsimonious explanations accounting for such behaviors. Consideration needs to be given to excluding the possibility that excessive behaviors are due to situational environmental/social factors, or symptomatic of an existing affective disorder such as depression or personality traits characteristic of cluster B personalities (namely, impulsivity) rather than the advocating for the establishment of new disorders.

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Not good enough? Further comments to the wording, meaning, and the conceptualization of Internet Gaming Disorder

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Authors: Elfrid Krossbakken, Ståle Pallesen, Helge Molde, Rune Aune Mentzoni and Turi Reiten Finserås

In their commentary entitled “Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field,” Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2016 ) criticize the use of the term “Internet” in

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Stepping back to advance: Why IGD needs an intensified debate instead of a consensus

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Author: Thorsten Quandt

In their insightful and important paper, Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2017 ) describe the current situation of the DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet gaming disorder (IGD) as “chaos and confusion.” The authors identify several problems, focusing on

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Authors: Espen Aarseth, Anthony M. Bean, Huub Boonen, Michelle Colder Carras, Mark Coulson, Dimitri Das, Jory Deleuze, Elza Dunkels, Johan Edman, Christopher J. Ferguson, Maria C. Haagsma, Karin Helmersson Bergmark, Zaheer Hussain, Jeroen Jansz, Daniel Kardefelt-Winther, Lawrence Kutner, Patrick Markey, Rune Kristian Lundedal Nielsen, Nicole Prause, Andrew Przybylski, Thorsten Quandt, Adriano Schimmenti, Vladan Starcevic, Gabrielle Stutman, Jan Van Looy and Antonius J. Van Rooij

rather than an exploration of the boundaries of normal versus pathological . What we have learned from the DSM-5 proposal for Internet Gaming Disorder is that many researchers will see this as formal validation of a new disorder, and stop conducting

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Inclusion of Gaming Disorder in ICD has more advantages than disadvantages

Commentary on: Scholars’ open debate paper on the World Health Organization ICD-11 Gaming Disorder proposal (Aarseth et al.)

Authors: Orsolya Király and Zsolt Demetrovics

, a recent study by Griffiths et al. ( 2016 ) (coauthored by the present authors as well as several authors of the debate paper) examined the nine IGD criteria from the DSM-5 and listed the main concerns of scholars regarding each of them. However

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Petry, N. M. & O’Brien, C. P. (2013). Internet gaming disorder and the DSM-5. Addiction (Abingdon, England) , 108 (7), 1186–1187. O’Brien C. P. Internet gaming disorder and the DSM-5

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disorder (IGD) was proposed as a condition warranting further study in Section III of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). The IGD classification aimed to improve consistency in the

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Internet gaming disorder: Inadequate diagnostic criteria wrapped in a constraining conceptual model

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Author: Vladan Starcevic

Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ) as a condition for further study. Kuss et al. ( in press ) also make important comments about the implications of the ambiguous DSM-5 conceptualization of IGD as a

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Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5); this is due to similarities in symptomatology and biology ( Potenza et al., 2003 ), genetics ( Slutske et al., 2000 ), and treatments ( Hodgins, Currie, & el-Guebaly, 2001 ; Petry et al., 2006 ; Petry, Weinstock

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