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. The finite element method in magnetics , Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest, 2008. Iványi A. The finite element method in magnetics

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, pressure, buried depth, soil temperature; soil thermal conductivity, oil viscosity, and oil density on the stochastic fluctuation of oil temperatures were investigated [ 6 ]. Finite element method is an effective method for temperature field analysis

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Chiampi M., Negro A. L., Tartaglia M. A finite element method to compute three-dimensional magnetic field distribution in transformer cores, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics , Vol. Mag-16, No. 6, 1980, pp. 1413

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fields 1998 Jin J. The finite element method in electromagnetics , John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2002

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. 85 ‒ 96 . [10] Kuczmann M. , Iványi A. The finite element method in magnetics , Budapest , Academic Press , 2008

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]. Borst and Boogaard [ 12 ] studied deformation and cracking in early age concrete modeled by finite element method considering hardening process of young concrete, heat production, stiffness evolution, and concrete creep. The numerical model of the solar

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An appreciation of usability of the finite element technique for the thermal analysis of stripe-geometry diode lasers is carried out in the present work. Thye technique appears to be very exact and surprisingly speed using even a standard IBM PC/AT microcomputer.

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Abstract  

New results of steady-state two-dimensional finite-element computations of temperature distributions of high power semiconductor laser arrays are presented. The influence of different thermal loads on the 2D temperature distribution in AlGaAs/GaAs gain-guided laser arrays is investigated. TheFEM model is tested by comparing it with analytical solutions. For numerical convenience, the latter is rewritten in a novel form, which is free of overflow problems. The maximum temperatures calculated by both methods agree within 1%. Several factors determining the thermal resistance of the device are quantitatively examined: the ratio of light emitting to non-emitting areas along the active zone, the amount of Joule losses, the current spreading, the solder thickness, and voids in the solder. This yields design rules for optimum thermal performance.

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machines 1951 Kuczmann M., Ivanyi A. The finite element method in magnetics , Akademiai Kiado, Budapest, 2008

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