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Abstract  

The use of thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry (TGMS) to study the state of preservation of archaeological bones has been investigated. As part of a collaborative multi-analytical study, bones exhumed from graves of the late Roman period in France and Italy were examined. A decrease in organic matter for the archaeological bones compared to that for new bone was confirmed, demonstrating that diagenesis of aged bones can be detected using TGMS. Different amounts of collagen were determined for bones from different graves and could, for the majority of specimens, be correlated with the visually observed preservation states.

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Abstract  

This pape discusses the use, of stable Cs as an activatable tracer for measuring performance of plant root intrusion barriers for solid waste disposal site cover systems. Experiments conducted at small-scale demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the technique and suggest that the methodology has application to a better understanding of plant root ecology.

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Egy 17. századi főúri temetkezőhely

Nádasdy Ferenc országbíró és a lékai Ágoston-rendi templom Nádasdy-kriptájának kialakítása

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author: Bálint Ugry

In recent decades, especially in German language areas, several monographs and studies have stressed the source value in political and social history of the representative relics of burial places and sepulchral art. The resting places of Hungarian aristocrats of the early modern age are also more than mere (style historical, iconographic) sources of “traditional” art historical investigations, as is also pointed out by several recent scientific works in Hungary.

Lord Chief Justice Ferenc III Nádasdy (1623–1671) had the Nádasdy family mausoleum built in Léka (Lockenhaus, Austria). The converted aristocrat commissioned Pietro Orsolino, master builder from Siena, to erect a church and monastery for the Augustinian hermits and the population of the small Transdanubian village. The innovation of the crypt completed in 1669 lies in admitting solely the remains of the Nádasdy family members according to the original concept of the chief justice, thus becoming the first family mausoleum in the crypt of a church running the whole length of the church space.

When Ferenc Nádasdy was executed for his part in the Wesselényi conspiracy against the court in Vienna in 1671, there were two tombs in the central space of the crypt to which an ornamental staircase led from the middle of the nave of the oval church. The chief justice had the double tomb (c. 1562) of his great grandparents palatine Tamás Nádasdy and Orsolya Kanizsay – an outstanding specimen of 16th century Hungarian sepulchral art – transferred from the chapel of Léka castle. The tomb is covered with a late gothic slab showing the palatine and his wife kneeling at the stem of the cross. The monumental baroque tomb of Ferenc Nádasdy and his wife Anna Julianna Esterházy (c. 1669) was probably made by masters of the Léka guild of builders and masons.

Research of the past years has shown that extensively travelled and highly cultured Ferenc Nádasdy was one of the most conscious aristocratic patrons of the art in Hungary who put the arts sharp-wittedly in the service of his own representation and the political propaganda of the Hungarian Kingdom. In his residences (Keresztúr, Sárvár, Seibersdorf, Pottendorf) he set up picture galleries with different representative goals each; as the holder of the advowson, he had churches (Lorettom, Léka) and chapels (Mariazell, St Stephen’s chapel) founded and ordered altar paintings. He relied on printing to disseminate internationally the historical continuity of the Hungarian statehood threatened by the Ottoman Empire (Mausoleum) and the unity of the Hungarian nation of the estates (series of Widemann portraits).

The crypt of the Léka church was the place of the reverence of ancestors and the expression of Ferenc Nádasdy’s ambition to become palatine. By positioning his and his wife’s tomb opposite his great-grandfather’s in the crypt he founded, he implied his wish to become similar to his forefather. During his political career he failed to acquire the title of palatine, but the “adopter” of the art patron model created by Nádasdy, his brother-in-law Pál Esterházy attained it. Similarly to Nádasdy, Esterházy also had a family crypt built later in the centre of his residence Kismarton (Eisenstadt, Austria) emulating in concept the example of Léka and the Graz mausoleum of Ferdinand II as regards form.

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. K ulcsár : A Kárpát-medencei szarmaták temetkezési szokásai (The Burial Rite of the Sarmatians of the Carpathian Basin) . Múzeumi füzetek 49 . Aszód 1998 . L akatos 1956

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. Biczó Piroska 2015 Szent István sírja a székesfehérvári Szűz Mária-prépostság templomában (The burial place of King Stephen the Saint in

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References Aspöck 2008 = E. Aspöck : What actually is a deviant burial? Comparing German-language and anglophone research . In: Deviant Burial in the Archaeological Record . Ed.: E. M. Murhy . Studies in funerary archaeology 2. Oxford

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New Approaches to the Bell Beaker “Phenomenon” Lost Paradise…? BAR–IS 690, 107–119. Turek, J. 2004 Craft symbolism in the Bell Beaker burial customs. Resources, production and social structure at the end of Eneolit period. In

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Bachman Z. The Early Christian burial chamber to the wine pitcher , (in Hungarian) Tájak Korok Múzeumok Kiskönyvtára, Budapest, 1990. Bachman Z. The

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Hälfte der Awarenzeit in der durch die Flüsse Körös, Tisza und Maros umgebenen Landschaft (Burial customs in the second half of the Avar Age in the area bordered by the Körös, Tisza and Maros rivers) . Arrabona 44/1 ( 2006 ) 87 – 110 . Bende

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