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Kutatócsoport, 1995; Petra Török, ed.: A határ és a határolt - Töprengések a magyar-zsidó irodalom létformáiról (Boundaries and Limits; Meditations on Hungarian Jewish Literature), Yahalom, 1997; Gábor Hamp, Özséb Horányi, and László Rábai, eds: Magyar

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Most of the contemporary scholarships of both literature and law categorize the coincidences and overlaps between an author’s literary work and his or her legal career, a given literary period and the same historical era of law and jurisprudence or between innumerable pieces of literature and the texts of the law merely as things of no real interest, curious facts that are not worthy of detailed academic analysis. While a point of view of this kind has its reasons the aim of the following paper is to change this attitude to a certain extent. In my opinion instead of talking about the “death of law and literature” we should consider the possibilites of (re)opening new ways of research for law and literature studies that may provide mutual benefits to both the representatives of legal and literary sciences. Hereinafter I will try to show why and how exploring the intertextual connections between the texts of law and those of literature seems to me the most fruitful endeavour to connect law and literature to each other.

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Literature 1919–1989. Szombathely 2003. I consulted the following editions: Eseji. Knjiga 1. Zagreb 1932; Glembajevi, Proza – Glembajevi, Drama. Zagreb 1954; Sabrana djela 4–5; Povratak Filipa Latinovicza. Zagreb 1973; Eseji

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Journal of the Bombay Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society . Bombay–London, Trübner. Chatterji , S. K. ( 1963 ): Languages and Literatures of Modern India . Calcutta

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.: Secondary tumors of the pancreas: an analysis of surgical and autopsy database and review of the literature. Wirchows Arch., 2004, 444 , 527–535. Basturk O. Secondary tumors of the

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What happens when we consider “poetics,” a term and concept well-known from Aristotle’s philosophical treatment of Greek epic and tragic drama, in the larger context of world literature as we understand it today? What would be the essential elements in the definition of poetics? What sort of critical issues it can address, and what resources it may draw on in the world’s various literary traditions? In the ancient world, East Asia and South Asia all have distinct traditions of literary expression with emphasis and critical conceptualizations rather different from those of the Greek-Roman tradition. What would the consideration of poetics in a broad cross-cultural perspective lead us to? In this presentation, these are the theoretical issues to be explored to arrive at a better understanding of poetics not only in the Western tradition, but truly of the world, with the richness of content and critical functions considered with relation to a global concept of world literature.

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Abstract  

The concept of meaning is often treated as if it were a unitary concept, also when it is used about literature. Yet literary meaning is not all of a kind, and hence one cannot generalize about its overall characteristics. What is commonly called meaning in literature comprises a number of separate phenomena. A simple distinction between linguistic meaning, applicatory meaning, and critical meaning is introduced with the help of a literary example, Edith Södergran’s poem “My Childhood Trees” (“Min barndoms träd”, 1922). The dangers of treating literary meaning as a homogeneous phenomenon are then illustrated by considering the standpoints of two theorists: Jonathan Culler, who describes literary meaning as indeterminate, and Robert Stecker, who portrays it as determinate. In reality, linguistic meaning will have to be understood as being determinate, applicatory meaning as indeterminate, and critical meaning, existing in many varieties, as sometimes the one, sometimes the other. Problems analogous to those besetting the concept of meaning also arise in connection with the critical use of several other key literary-theoretical notions, such as “literature”, “text”, “form”, and “genre”.

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Vol. 98. 420 453 Seidensticker, B. 1992. The Political Use of Antiquity in the Literature of the German Democratic Republic, Illinois Classical

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" Novels: Problems of "Modernization" and "Archaization". In: Bauer, R., Fokkema, D. & De Graat, M. (eds.) Proceedings of the XIIth Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association / Actes Du XIIe Congrès De L'association Internationale De

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Abstract  

The concept of “world literature” subordinates literature to space. Both a critique of the spatial presuppositions involved in accounts of the “world” offered by world-literature studies and an endorsement of the resistance to spatial determination common to much imaginative literature suggest that this subordination should be controversial.

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