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Abou-Awad, B. A., El-Sherif, A. A., Hassan, M. F. and Abou-Elela, M. M. (1998): Laboratory studies on development, longevity, fecundity and predation of Cydnoseius negevi (Swirski and Amitai) (Acari

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Bhattacharjee , P. C. ( 1989 ): Krantzolaspina rebatii , a new genus and a new species (Acari: Mesostigmata: Parholaspididae) from Dibrugarh, Assam, India . In: G. P. Channabasavanna and C. A. Viraktamath (eds): Progress in Acarology , 1, Brill

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and Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in vineyards. III. Influence of variety characteristics on the success of A. aberrans and T. pyri releases. J. Appl. Ent. 114, 455-462. Role of Amblyseius aberrans

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., Refaat A. M. and Momen F. M. (2001a): Repellent and oviposition — deterring activity of rosemary and sweet majoram on the spider mites Tetranychus urticae and Eutetranychus orientalis (Acari: Tetranychidae). Acta Phytopathol. et Entomol. Hung. 36, 155

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The biology of Agistemus exsertus Gonzalez was studied to determine the suitability of different phytoseiid eggs as prey. The development was faster and reproduction was higher when A. exsertus fed on eggs of Amblyseius lindquisti Schuster and Pritchard, Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) and Amblyseius zaheri Yousef and El borolossy (6.57 days and 111.5 eggs; 6.71 days and 110.1 eggs and 6.93 days and 101.0 eggs) than that of Euseius scutalis Athias-Henriot, Neoseiulus barkeri (Hughes) and Amblyseius swiriskii Athias-Henriot (8.6 days and 63.1 eggs; 7.29 days and 52.0 eggs and 7.87 days and 37.7 eggs), respectively. A. exsertus consumed daily more N. barkeri and A. zaheri eggs (4.63 and 3.85) than other phytoseiid eggs, respectively. Deits of A. lindquisti, N. cucumeris and E. scutalis (eggs) provided the greatest female longevity and the least was in case of N. barkeri.

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The direct toxicity of some essential, mineral and plant oils to the eggs and females of the predacious mite Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) was tested in the laboratory. Sweet basil oil was the most toxic essential oil to females N. cucumeris, while sweet marjoram oil was the least toxic one (LC50=2.315 and 7.021%, respectively). In contrast, rosemary oil was toxic to eggs of N. cucumeris, while sweet basil oil was the least effective oil against predator eggs (LC50 = 2.695 and 11.950%, respectively). The mineral oil capl-l 1was the most toxic one to adult females (LC50= 0.849%) while natur'l oil was the least (LC50= 4.691%), respectively. In contrast, natur'l oil was proved to be highly toxic to predator eggs while bio-dux oil was the least effective oil against the egg stage. Females of N. cucumeris suffered a depression in reproduction when females treated and fed on prey formerly kept on treated plant leaves with LC50 concentration of each oil used in our studies. Rosemary and sweet marjoram as well as bio-dux oils seem to be slightly harmful to N. cucumeris at (LC50) concentration of each oil.

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Two parts of the plant Capparis aegyptia, leaves and fruits, were extracted successfully with 4 different solvents. These solvents namely n-hexane, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and ethanol. These extracts were tested for their toxicity against eggs and adult females of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch. Extracts of both parts of the plant, prepared from various solvents were affected the behavior, toxicity and fecundity of females under laboratory conditions. Ethyl acetate extract of leaves and fruits was the most potent extract tested against eggs and adult females of T. urticae. In contrast, ethanol extract of fruits was the least effective extract against both tested stages. The egg stage was less susceptible to most different extracts of both parts of C. aegyptia. Leaf discs treated with LC50 concentration of various extracts showed a high percentage of repellency in case of ethanol extract from leaves and fruits (86.67 and 96.42%), respectively. Treated females with LC50 concentration of different extracts showed a higher remarkable percentage of mortality as well as a reduction in the total number of eggs laid during 15 days with fruit extracts than that with leaves extract.

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Accounts are given on the eriophyoid fauna of Hungary. Based on the literature records, a total of 336 mite species are listed from 370 host species of 55 plant families. The families Phytoptidae, Eriophyidae and Diptilomiopidae are represented by 12, 303 and 21 species, respectively. Aculus dictamni (Farkas), Aculus mori (Farkas) and Cecidophyes gymnaspis (Nalepa) are new combinations.

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., Brennan, M., Houben, K. and Osborne, L. (2009): Evaluation of Neoseiulus cucumeris and Amblyseius swirskii (Acari: Phytoseiidae) as biological control agents of chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on pepper. Biol. Control

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. (2003): Revised Keys to World Genera of Eriophyoidea (Acari: Prostigmata). Indira Publishing House West Bloomfield, USA. iv+244 p. Flechtmann C. H. W

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