Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 1,724 items for :

  • "manuscripts" x
Clear All

The question of authenticity in the creation of Bartók’s Viola Concerto has been one of the most enigmatic in the viola repertoire. Inconsistencies among revisions of the work by different scholars since the first attempt by Tibor Serly in 1946 reveal that the task of uncovering an authentic final version by scrutinizing the manuscript itself is not always a clearcut or “purely mechanical” endeavor. Following a brief overview of the manuscript’s layout, this article addresses some ambiguous details based on a number of puzzling indications. Some of these questions can only be resolved by acquiring an in-depth knowledge of Bartók’s musical language. The manuscript draft is thereby approached not only by studying the primary-source materials alone, but also by means of a theoretic-analytical approach. The latter takes into account principles of modality, polymodal combination, and more abstract types of pitch sets, such as hybrid modes, the octatonic scale, and other more chromatic configurations. General types of scalar or modal construction are discussed as basic determinants in performing certain figural details. Such principles as diatonic expansion, chromatic compression, and polymodal chromaticism are shown, for instance, to be essential for understanding the content and function of the trill figures and the larger linear constructions to which they belong. Thus, we may assume that the combined levels of research and analysis suggested above are essential in arriving at Bartók’s authentic conception.

Restricted access

public peer review (PPR), electronic publishing offers new possibilities of quality assurance that cannot be realized in traditional closed peer review. Whereas traditional peer review of submitted manuscripts involves the use of designated reviewers

Restricted access

The young Gogol published a study on the teaching of geography for children in 1831. At the same time, he was writing the collection of short stories, Evenings on a Farm near Dikanka (1831–1832). We can observe interesting connections between his texts – prose fictions and pedagogical writing – of this period: motives belonging to geography, history and folklore make a specifically large context. The author’s interest in geology, as he writes, in the „underground geography” (“подземная география”) – the earth’s crust, rocks, strata – corresponds with the “underground mythology and folklore” in the Dikanka stories, with the demonic figures ( колдун, ведьма, черт ), places ( abyss, ravine, depths of the earth, swamp, churchyard ) and time ( night ). In this study, on the basis of the Gogol’s long-time unedited manuscripts ( Неизданный Гоголь , ed. by I. A. Vinogradov, Moscow, 2001) we investigate the common roots of the seemingly heterogeneous motives to discover the hidden strata and meanings of his early works.

Restricted access

The occurrence of the isolated pressus in the Gregorian Mass Proprium chants was examined in 11 early manuscripts. The early written tradition for the pressus in isolation is not at all uniform. The frequency of a pressus notation varies widely from one source to another. The author sketched the potential power of standard non parametric statistical theory in order to overcome the problem of contamination that until now hampered the study of relationships between manuscripts. The notation of the pressus in isolation is used as an illustration.

Restricted access

Abstract

This paper presents a critical edition of Mordecai Qazaz's poem Adam oglu 'Man's son' written in Crimean Karaim probably at the end of the 18th century. It was published in 1841 under another title by Jacob Firkovich who did not provide the name of its author. This publication has not yet been examined. It is only now that we can identify it with Adam oglu. In the present edition, the text is edited on the basis of four manuscripts and the printed edition. Attempt was made to established the basic form of the poem and discuss language features.

Restricted access

In his edition of Pro Milone A. C. Clark has misreported numerous readings of two Floren­tine manuscripts: Laur. XXIII Sin. 3 and BN J.IV. 4. This paper presents a list of mistakes and the rele­vant true readings of the MSS.

Restricted access

This paper contains a critical edition of an unpublished Sanskrit play preserved in an incomplete Nepalese manuscript dated to 1382. In the introduction an attempt is made to determine when and where the play might have been written, and on what possible sources the plot is based.

Restricted access

Abstract  

The credibility of the publication system in science is determined in large part by the precision of the manuscript review process. Studies on the precision of the review process in scientific journals have reported conflicting results. This paper reviews those studies and re-examines the data reported. The findings indicate that highly selective decision-making with imprecise reviewers results in outcomes that are only slightly better than chance.

Restricted access

The manuscript Brussels Bibliothèque royale II 3824 is a chant manuscript in French notational style. It was written for Saint-Bénigne of Dijon. The writing of the manuscript dates it after 1228 and before 1288. The appearance of the gradual, Sacerdotes eius, twice in close placement to one another (folio 244r, 255 v) is to be regarded as unusual. It seems probable that the Brussels manuscript was copied from one or more exemplars. The important manuscript, Montpellier H 159 also originated in Dijon. There are several minor differences between the readings of Sacerdotes eius in the two manuscripts. The melodic versions are not identical. They are not organized in the same fashion. The appearance of two variant versions of Sacerdotes eius is tied to the copying process, either from one or more exemplars. The copying process was wedded to the process of faithful copying rather than critical editing.

Restricted access

Abstract

The article introduces a manuscript organically related to the 1416 visit of King Sigismund to England that has so far been unknown in Hungarian scholarship, moreover, its iconographic evidence, i.e. its ink drawings have not been sufficiently investigated in the international Sigismund-historiography. On surface level the textual references and the iconographic representation provide evidence for the Anglo-Hungarian, Anglo-German relations of the early fifteenth century. On the other hand, it also shed light to the Anglo-Continental relations of the 1480s–90s, the reign of King Richard III (1483–85). The so-calledWarwick-, or Rous Roll, a Middle English codex attributed to the household genealogist of the earls of Warwick, John Rous, also has a Latin variant – the Lancastrian Roll – held at the College of Arms (the college of the Garter King of Arms, collegium armorum) in London. The Pageant has been dated to varying dates between 1483 and 1492, though most scholars agree that the most probable date is between 1483 and 1485, the reign of Richard III. The Rous Rolls are dated a bit earlier, to the late 1470s or early 1480s. The British Library Catalogue puts the English roll between 1483 and 1485. The Latin manuscript might be even made earlier, between 1477 and 1485. All three narratives report on the close and even intimate relationship between the earl and King Sigismund of Luxemburg of Hungary, but from the point of view of Hungarian memoriae regum the first one, the Beauchamp Pageant is the most significant since it has precious iconographic evidence on the political activity, the court and the entourage of King Sigismund and Queen Barbara during the Council of Constance. Beyond giving an overview of the manuscript, this study aims to investigate how and from where the author and illuminator could have learnt of and gathered information on the Hungarian relations of the earl and on what grounds the artist portrayed King Sigismund.

Restricted access