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Travel writing has enjoyed continuous success since the Renaissance, and has been an important factor in shaping perceptions of individual and group identities. Especially during the second half of the eighteenth century and throughout the nineteenth century travelogues constituted an influential part of the discourse on culture, and helped, through their descriptions of the foreign and a reaffirmation of what is “us”, establish the ideology of nationalism. Works by British authors such as William Wordsworth and the travel writings of Hungarian poet Sándor Petőfi and politician, essayist, and novelist József Eötvös offer examples of different strategies of using landscape as means of affirming contours of national identity.

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Taking as a point of departure the record included in 'Crónica do Felicissimo Rei D. Manuel' (1566), the paper is focused on the description and analysis of the historical, geographical, political, cultural, intellectual, as well as personal dimension of the visit paid to Kraków by a famous Portuguese humanist Damiao de Gois. It is also a contribution to the panorama of the Polish-Portuguese cultural relations during the Renaissance, when Kraków was an important centre not only of the local but also of the European intellectual pursuits.

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In this paper I scrutinize the origin of the concept of dreams influenced by mens’ daylightexperience. To this end I showcase some texts from Hellenistic literature until English Renaissance which to my mind can be brought into connection with each other in terms of realism of dream-vision. By looking on the common traits one can arrive at the conclusion that the dream-realism is a concept which first became popular in the Hellenism and it was from there that it took its long way through ages.

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Summary

The relief in the Hungarian National Museum, attributed in the Hungarian art historio-graphy to a local Hungarian Master of the Renaissance shows stylistic features of the Verrocchio cercle and may be dated earlier than the inscription with the date of 1526. It was a sculpted image which could be inserted into an architecture or in a frame. In 1777 it was surely in the possession of a canon of Vác cathedral, but its provenience – determined by the division of the aristocratic family of the Báthory in a Catholic and a Protestant line – is uncertain and can only be enlighted by written sources.

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Resource : The Council for Museums Archives and Libraries 2001: Renaissance in the Regions: A New Vision for England’s Museums . London: ReSource. Renaissance in the Regions: A New Vision for England’s Museums 2001

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Abstract

The provenance of several stone carvings thought to have belonged among the renaissance carved stones of King Matthias Corvinus' Buda palace is uncertain. A huge gable field with a coat of arms and a monumental inscribed tablet came to the collection of the Hungarian National Museum in 1874. Earlier, they adorned the old building of the University Library — the convent of the Franciscans of Pest — but it has not been clarified yet how they had got there. This time, sources have been found about their transfer into the National Museum. They were involved in an exchange: for the carved stones (some Roman ones as well in addition to the renaissance stones) that were extracted when the old library building was pulled down, the University Library received the second copy of Chronica Hungarorum (Buda, Andreas Hess, 1473), the first book printed in Hungary preserved in the National Széchényi Library. This copy of the Chronicle has permanently been in Hungary and eventually got into the National Museum and the Library together with the collection of Miklós Jankovich, the great art collector. It was part of a colligatum containing Caius Julius Caesar's De bello Gallico, which — to a superficial observer — might also have been taken for a product of the Hess printing office. From the colligatum (adorned with a late medieval Hungarian book cover) the Hess incunabulum was removed and given to the University Library together with another four old books printed in Hungary.

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A reneszánsz-humanizmus egyik sajátos, a többi reneszánsz mozgalomtól megkülönböztető jegye a görög kultúra újjászületése. Ebben döntő szerepet játszottak a görög klasszikusok új latin nyelvű fordításai, melyek jellegét az egész korszakra előre meghatározta Leonardo Bruni programadó tevékenysége. Jelen tanulmány ezen újraélesztésnek elemzi mind a metódusát („hogyan?”), mind a motivációját („miért és mit?”). A dolgozat először a Bruni által kidolgozott modern fordítói módszert értelmezi, mely a szöveg lényegét a benne megnyilvánuló értelemben látta, aztán a korabeli szellemi irányzatok tükrében mutatja be a módszer történeti-filológiai hátterét, illetve összetett nyelvi szempontrendszerét; majd föltárja azokat az irodalmi és aktuális jellegű indítékokat, netán személyes momentumokat, melyek alapján az egyes görög szerzőket és műveket fordításra kiválasztották és célzatos rendbe állították.

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At the beginning of the 19th century, when the poets wanted to create the national epic poem of Hungarians, they followed the Aeneid; at the end of the 18th century, when the agricultural reform was established in Hungary under the Habsburgs, the poets wrote agricultural poems in Vergilian form and translated and modernized his Georgics. The world of Vergil depicted in the Eclogues and in the Georgics became the idealized Arcadia, and poets and writers or the aristocracy — influenced by Vergil — wanted to create their own Arcadia. The pastoral theme and the bucolical forms were very popular in Hungarian literature of this period, at the end of the 18th century. The poets had pastoral names, and very different topics were expressed in eclogues (e.g. actual events of politics). In the first half of the 20th century Vergil had a new renaissance connected to the bimillennium of his birth. And this renaissance reached the most expressive element of the presence of Vergil’s Bucolics in the poetry of Miklós Radnóti (1909–1944), whose eclogues are the most tragic expression of cruelty of war. My paper focuses on the influence of Virgil’s Bucolics in Radnóti’s poetry, but his examples can attest to the deep influence of Vergil on Hungarian literature.

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. London , Methuen . Drew-Bear , Annette ( 1994 ): Painted Faces on the Renaissance Stage: The Moral Significance of Face-Painting Conventions . Lewisburg , Bucknell

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In the exhibition “Legacy of King Matthias. Late Renaissance art in Hungary (16–17th c.)” held in 2008 there were four thematically identical paintings – the “Nation's Tableaux” displayed side by side. Until now, four pictures of the kind showing the Holy Crown and the coats of arms of the provinces of the country were known: one in the Hungarian National Museum, one in the Szombathely Gallery, and two in the collection of the Trencsén (Trenčín) Museum (dating from 1673–76 and around 1800). The article describes a fifth specimen kept in the Dominican primary school in Kőszeg. Its inscription, deviating somewhat from that of the other four pictures, follows the fate of the Hungarian crown up to 1784. The client who commissioned it must have belonged to the opposition of Joseph II's policies.

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